Administration of Justice

Administration of Justice (ADMJ)

ADMJ 300 Introduction to Administration of Justice

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the characteristics of the American criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on examining due process, U.S. Constitutional Rights, criminal activity, crime causation and criminology, domestic and international criminal threats, law enforcement response to criminal activity, and future trends for law enforcement. Students will explore the components of the American justice system, including law enforcement, courts, and correctional services with an emphasis on ethics and leadership.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the purpose, authority, and relationship between law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections at the local, state, and federal levels.
  • differentiate crime classifications and various legal definitions.
  • recall due process and protections provided by the U.S. Constitution.
  • explain criminological theory and why it is important in understanding crime and criminality.
  • demonstrate ethical decision making and leadership ability.

ADMJ 301 Investigative Report Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a study of the techniques of preparing written investigative reports in a clear, comprehensive, concise, and logical manner. Emphasis is placed on administration of justice terminology, use of English and organization of information, note taking and report writing, and presentation of testimony in court.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and compile data for use in report writing.
  • write an investigative report communicating facts in a clear, comprehensive, concise, and logical manner.
  • define and demonstrate an understanding of vocabulary commonly used in the criminal justice system.
  • understand how to compile notes from an interview or interrogation in a logical and organized manner.
  • demonstrate an ability to take field notes and transpose those notes into a document that can be offered as evidence in a court of law.
  • recognize the consequences of failing to write accurate and factual reports.

ADMJ 302 Community Relations: Multicultural Issues

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the complex relationship between communities and the law enforcement, judicial and correctional institutions of the justice system. The course addresses the role that race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, culture and the criminal justice professional play in shaping these relationships. The course will explore new strategies, skills, tools, and cultural knowledge necessary for personnel engaged in all aspects of the criminal justice system. Special topics include how terrorism and the need for homeland security have changed the dynamics of police-community relations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the history and evolution of multiculturalism in the U.S. and the challenges presented by a multicultural society.
  • identify and explain key issues that pose potential conflict between diverse communities and the courts, police and corrections.
  • identify and describe strategies for the administration of justice in a multicultural society.

ADMJ 308 Crime Scene Investigation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:51 hours LEC; 9 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of crime scene investigation, role of the crime scene investigator and criminalist, evolution of forensic sciences, including primary protection of the crime scene, the principles of physical evidence and how physical evidence can assist in solving crimes. The student will learn how to properly document a crime scene and will examine the relationship between the investigator, the crime scene investigator, and the crime laboratory.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify various types of criminal evidence (testimonial, documentary, demonstrative or physical) utilized in investigations.
  • identify all the major categories of physical evidence utilized in investigations.
  • identify the techniques and requirements of crime scene and evidence collection including but not limited to collection and analysis of fingerprints, firearms, evidence, biological evidence, trace evidence, impression evidence and crime scene reconstruction techniques to include photography, and sketches.
  • identify the various responsibilities of investigators, first responder's, supervisors and laboratory technicians.
  • identify the ethical decision making and leadership principles.

ADMJ 320 Concepts of Criminal Law

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 and ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the philosophy, history and structure of criminal law in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on the classification of crime, the general elements of crime, the definitions of common and statutory law, and the nature of acceptable evidence. This course utilizes case studies to introduce students to criminal law and the classification of crimes against persons, property, morals, and public welfare. The course will also include discussion of the U.S. Constitution, prosecution and defense decision making, criminal culpability, and defenses to crimes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the adversarial court system, sources of criminal law and historical evolution of criminal law.
  • identify elements of offenses as they relate to crimes against persons, property, morals, and public welfare.
  • classify crimes according to severity.
  • explain capacity to commit crime, causation, and culpability.
  • use current and recent cases to illustrate the elements, severity, components, and aspects of the basic concepts of criminal law.
  • discuss the goals and characteristics of criminal law.
  • discuss the philosophical and historical evolution of criminal law, noting the role of the judiciary in its development.
  • know the basic terminology, definitions, and theories of criminal law.
  • identify elements of offenses against the person, property, morals, and public welfare.
  • classify crimes according to severity.
  • explain capacity to commit crime, causation, and culpability.
  • critically analyze various components of our system of criminal law.
  • explain and discuss criminal defenses, legal justifications, and burdens of proof.

ADMJ 322 Criminal Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 122
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will examine the criminal procedures and how they are applied in the American justice system. Topics will include fundamental concepts of law, exclusionary rule, bail, extradition and rendition. Additional topics will include laws and procedures of arrest, order of trial procedures, motions, writs and appeals, limitations of prosecution, rights of the accused, prosecution and defense strategies, judgment, and sentencing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the historical foundation for American criminal procedures.
  • explain crime elements and give specific examples of major crimes.
  • critique the Exclusionary Rule and explain how it applies to the 4th amendment and trial processes.
  • assess police-citizen encounters and compare and contrast consensual with non-consensual encounters.
  • define arrest and list the procedures necessary to ensure an arrest is legal.
  • debate the Miranda decision and its relevance to the 5th amendment of the U.S. Constitution.
  • explain the different phases of the trial process and reasons for each related to constitutional guarantees and protections.
  • explain the roles of the prosecutor, defense attorney and the judge during the trial.
  • define and explain the legal protections reliant to hearsay and privileged communications.
  • explain due processand its relevance to the 6th, 8th, and 14th amendments of the U.S. Constitution and how those rights are insured before, during, and after a trial process.
  • demonstrate ethical decision making and leadership ability.

ADMJ 323 Legal Aspects of Evidence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 124
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the constitutional foundation of the rules of evidence as applied in United States law. Emphasis is placed on the types of evidence and the laws governing admissibility of evidence in criminal proceedings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze court processes and identify roles of key participants in criminal trials.
  • define various classifications of evidence and its admissibility in a criminal trial.
  • analyze the laws of search and seizure as they apply in the U.S.
  • evaluate the various types of criminal identification, to include infield lineups, infield showups, and photographic lineups.
  • demonstrate ethical decision making and leadership ability.

ADMJ 330 Criminal Investigation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to basic investigative responsibilities and procedures as applied to criminal investigations. Topics include crime scene management, forensic and physical evidence handling, search and seizure, property crimes, violent crimes, organized criminal enterprises, gangs, and domestic and international terrorist organizations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate and articulate basic investigative responsibilities, to include note taking, photographic documentation, preserving and processing evidence, and crime scene sketching.
  • recall search and seizure protections under the fourth amendment to the U.S. Constitution, to include various exceptions to the rule.
  • distinguish between property crime and violent crime offenses.
  • discuss activities of criminal enterprise organizations, criminal gangs, and terrorist organizations.
  • demonstrate ethical decision making and leadership abilities.

ADMJ 331 Patrol Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will explore the early development and present-day role of patrol operations and techniques used by local law enforcement agencies. Major topics will include community policing, intelligence-led policing, effective patrol strategies, gang awareness, and key factors affecting deployment of patrol resources such as applying intelligence-led policing techniques and fostering community involvement to meet department objectives.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the primary duties and responsibilities of a patrol officer and identify methods officers use to meet those obligations.
  • identify essential components of community policing and describe how they apply to problem solving strategies using ethical decision making and leadership ability.
  • create examples of problem solving strategies in response to gang activity, youth violence, and other community crime problems.

ADMJ 333 Computer Crime and Digital Evidence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 310; Students should have basic computer user skills prior to enrolling in this course.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of computer crime investigation, including the role of computer devices in various types of criminal activities, computer related criminal law, methods of collecting digital evidence and how digital evidence can assist in solving crimes. The student will learn how to properly perform and document digital evidence collection. The student will learn about court presentation and emerging case law related to computer crimes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding the operation of computer systems and the role of computers in crime and investigations.
  • demonstrate an understanding of computer related criminal laws.
  • articulate knowledge of Internet related crime.
  • articulate an understanding of digital evidence and collection methods.

ADMJ 340 Introduction to Correctional Services

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of the history and trends of adult and juvenile corrections including probation and parole. It focuses on the legal issues, specific laws, and general operation of correctional institutions. The relationship between corrections and other components of the judicial system are examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the history of corrections and explain current trends within corrections.
  • research the legal issues, specific laws, and general issues encountered in a corrections facility.
  • explain the relationship between corrections and other components of the administration of justice system.
  • distinguish between adult and juvenile corrections, probation, and parole.

ADMJ 370 Illegal Drugs - Identification and Investigation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The study of current drugs of abuse will include identification, street terminology, pricing, packaging, methods of use, duration of effect, addiction, history, and recognizing persons under the influence. The course also examines current laws and law enforcement agency functions, including search and seizure, search warrants, enforcement trends, ethics and leadership, and treatment programs versus incarceration. This course will also study several high profile drug traffickers who have been incarcerated.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize various drug classifications and their effect on the central nervous system.
  • recognize the adverse impact that drug addiction has on individuals and society as a whole.
  • define elements of specific drug related laws.
  • demonstrate ethical decision making and leadership ability.

ADMJ 494 Topics in Administration of Justice

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Designed to deal with current problems or specific topics concerning the administration of justice. The particular subject to be covered each semester will be determined by the Administration of Justice staff. May be taken two times for credit.


ADMJ 495 Independent Studies in Administration of Justice

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

ADMJ 498 Work Experience in Administration of Justice

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of Administration of Justice. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.