Anthropology

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of physical or biological anthropology, one of the sub-disciplines of anthropology. Physical anthropology considers the role of culture in the human biological experience. This course traces the evolution of the human line and examines our relationship to our closest living relatives, the non-human primates. This course provides an overview of human genetics, human variation, primatology, human and primate evolution, human growth and development, skeletal anatomy, and forensic anthropology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the skeletal and behavioral similarities and differences between humans and non-human primates.
  • infer how evolutionary forces shape modern human physical variation.
  • integrate knowledge of the mechanisms of human evolution such as gene flow, mutation, and natural selection.
  • analyze the fossil evidence for human evolution.

ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ANTH 300 (may be taken previously)
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory laboratory course dealing with human evolution, human and non-human primate variation, genetics, and skeletal biology. This course provides hands-on experience with skeletal remains, anthropometric equipment, genetic testing, and other materials and techniques necessary to an holistic understanding of biological anthropology. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate major biological differences among non-human primate groups, extant human populations, and extinct hominin groups.
  • analyze primate morphology and behavior within an evolutionary framework.
  • evaluate evidence of evolutionary change in extinct and living primates, including humans.
  • validate and critique systems of taxonomic classification for living and extinct primate species.

ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of the field of forensic anthropology, which is the study of human remains in a medicolegal context. This course emphasizes current techniques used in the analysis of human skeletal remains, medicolegal procedures, and the role of the anthropologist in the investigative process. It examines the basics of bone biology, methods of skeletal analysis, and recognition of bone pathology and trauma. This course will address the broader aspects of applied anthropology and the role of anthropology in law enforcement and human rights issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • validate the application of the scientific method in a medico-legal setting, including forensic anthropological jurisprudence and sound standards-based methodology.
  • describe the biological properties of human skeletal tissue including the processes of bone development and decomposition, response to trauma, and normative versus pathological presentations.
  • evaluate the morphological changes in human bone caused by trauma, taphonomical change, and pathological conditions.
  • explain techniques used in analysis and demonstrate how to apply these techniques to a legal setting.
  • appraise the role of a forensic anthropologist at a crime scene investigation.

ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the varieties of customs and forms of social organizations found in our species. A multicultural, comparative approach is used to study the structure and function of various economic, political, social and religious systems found in Western and non-Western societies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the scope of the anthropological field, and discuss the role of cultural anthropology regarding the interconnectedness of socio-economic, political and cultural interactions during the colonial era.
  • recognize ethnocentrism's effect on human behavior and evaluate the ethical dilemmas inherent in conducting anthropological research.
  • analyze the form of various cultural institutions (such as marriage, religion, and social organization) using the findings of anthropological research.
  • analyze changes in anthropological theory and methods of inquiry, as well as the economic, political and socio-cultural forces of globalization amongst diverse groups.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry and its application in archaeological research.
  • articulate the legal, operational, and ethical goals of cultural resource management and heritage preservation.
  • critically analyze archaeological data sets related to cultural sequences and apply appropriate methods and theories.

ANTH 319 Visual Anthropology: Introduction to Ethnographic Film

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an introduction to the use of film by anthropologists as a research and educational tool. A series of films depicting different cultures from around the world are viewed and evaluated. Analysis will focus on examining various attributes of ethnographic film and its treatment by anthropological filmmakers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the work of anthropologists in fieldwork settings.
  • identify the multi-dimensional, sensory experience of culture.
  • evaluate ethnographic films by analyzing specific elements: i.e. role of narration, use of synchronous sound, editing, degree of subject involvement, distortions and bias, and ethnographic context.
  • categorize the historical development of ethnographic film-making.
  • compare the style, form, and focus of ethnographic films produced at different times, reflecting changes in anthropological theory.
  • analyze ethnographic films as they pertain to controversial issues in the discipline of anthropology and in popular culture including but not limited to ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, classism, etc.
  • discuss the shift away from the outsider's point of view to visual sovereignty since the 1980's.

ANTH 320 Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the discipline of archeology and provides a broad survey of world prehistory. Students will explore the fundamental principles, theoretical approaches, and methods utilized by archaeologists to reconstruct prehistory, and will explore a sample of the major developments of human prehistory from the Upper Paleolithic period through the historic period. Examples of the archaeological record will be drawn from all major geographic areas of the world. A field trip is required as part of this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the relationship between archaeology and anthropology, and illustrate the use of archaeological methods with reference to cultural sequences.
  • incorporate archaeological evidence into an understanding of historical records and cultural behaviors.
  • identify the various archaeological theories, methods, and techniques used to investigate the human past.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry and its application in archaeological research.
  • discuss scientifically responsible and culturally respectful methods of archaeological retrieval and preservation including Cultural Resource Management (CRM) and adherence to Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) guidelines as an ethical framework of cultural resource management and heritage preservation.

ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b) (effective Summer 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the concepts, methods and theoretical perspectives employed in the scientific study of archaeology. Emphasis will be placed on how data is retrieved from the archaeological record, and how it can be used to address questions about the development and evolution of human social systems. Topics will include archaeological theory, survey and excavation methods, laboratory analysis, reconstructing past environments, and drawing conclusions about the past from archaeological data. This course will draw upon examples from the New World as well as archaeological examples worldwide. This course may require field trips outside of class time.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the various archaeological theories, methods, and techniques used to investigate the human past.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry and its application in archaeological research.
  • articulate the goals, and the legal, operational, and ethical framework of cultural resource management and heritage preservation.
  • illustrate the use of archaeological methods with reference to cultural sequences.
  • discuss the relationship between anthropology and archaeology.

ANTH 330 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a cross-cultural study of the forms and functions of supernatural beliefs and associated rituals in various societies around the world. The emphasis of the course is on understanding beliefs and rituals within their social contexts and through broad comparisons to derive insight into the general functions of beliefs and rituals in human life.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast religious and magical principles from a variety of cultures.
  • integrate anthropological methods into the study of both preliterate and literate religious systems.
  • evaluate the ways that religious beliefs are integrated into other societal structures, such as economy, social organization, political organization and healing practices.
  • evaluate the role of magic, ritual, and belief systems in contemporary society.
  • incorporate culturally relativistic terms in the analysis and appraisal of religious experience in global societies.

ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D (effective Fall 2019)
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will involve the exploration of language including the formal structures of language and cultural dimensions of communication through an anthropological perspective. Three core areas that will be addressed include: structural linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics); historical linguistics (language origin, evolution and change); and sociolinguistics. Linguistic concepts that will be addressed include theoretical assumptions and methodologies pertaining to the biological basis of language, the analytical techniques of linguistics, the role of language in establishing world view, critical thinking and social interaction, how language is used to create and reinforce relationships of power (race, class, gender), diverse languages and dialects, bilingualism, literacy, the social motivation of language change, and the impact of language loss.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the biological basis of language, including genetic, physiological, and neurological aspects of language, and the biocultural origins of language.
  • apply linguistic theory and methods to a social interpretation of languages and their relation to culture.
  • interpret and describe language using structural linguistic techniques.
  • describe the role of language as a reflection of culture and ways in which language influences thought as well as recognize the interrelated acquisition of language and culture.
  • examine the diversity of language and dialects (how people are treated differently based on their dialect and membership in minority populations vs. majority populations), bilingualism, literacy, change, and the impact of language loss (due to chosen change and/or forced change or assimilation due to racism).
  • examine cross-cultural non-verbal communication.
  • apply the methodologies of historical linguistics and language comparisons, describing the process of linguistic divergence and the creation of new languages or dialects.
  • demonstrate an awareness of how race, class, gender, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation intersect with language use.

ANTH 392 Principles of Heritage Interpretation

  • Same As:BIOL 392 and HIST 392
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This interdisciplinary course covers the basics of interpreting historical, cultural, and natural resources to the general public. Interpretation is a communication process that forges emotional and intellectual connections between the interests of the audience and the inherent meaning of the resource. Topics include developing an interpretive program using a thematic approach and learning program delivery techniques. Completion of this course will qualify students to apply for professional certification through the National Association for Interpretation as a Certified Interpretive Guide (CIG). This course is recommended for students interested in history, biology, anthropology, recreation, education, and communication. Not open to students who have received credit for Biology 392 or History 392. This course requires field trips.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define heritage interpretation.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the history, principles, and philosophy of interpretation as it is practiced in natural resources settings (parks and forests) and a variety of other settings (museums, nature centers, zoos, arboretums, planetariums, aquariums, botanical gardens, historic sites, etc.).
  • compose interpretive themes, goals, and objectives.
  • research, outline and develop an interpretive presentation.

ANTH 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

ANTH 498 Work Experience in Anthropology

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of Anthropology. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.