Biology

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 100 Introduction to Concepts of Human Anatomy and Physiology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV (effective Summer 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of anatomy and physiology, with coverage of all body systems. It is a non-transferable course designed for students requiring a one semester prerequisite for certain allied health programs, for students wanting to improve critical thinking, learning skills, and college-level vocabulary in preparation for more rigorous courses, and for any students with a desire to explore and to improve their understanding of the human body.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply basic skills to generate and interpret oral and written communication about the human body.
  • apply basic critical thinking to analyze structure and function of the human body.
  • evaluate the roles of each body system in promoting necessary life functions and maintaining homeostasis.
  • assess how lifestyle choices, environmental conditions, and genetics impact each body system.
  • apply varied learning strategies to master basic human anatomy & physiology.

BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and MATH 100 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Biology 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of major topics in the biological sciences for the non-science major with an emphasis on human biology. Units covered include the origin of life, cell structure and chemistry, metabolism, Mendelian and molecular genetics, genetic engineering, evolution, anatomy and physiology of humans, animal behavior and ecology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the basic cellular, anatomical and physiological mechanisms by which organisms, including humans, maintain homeostasis using correct biological vocabulary.
  • describe the basic processes of cellular reproduction and genetics and analyze the implications of related modern biotechnologies.
  • explain the basic principles of evolution and biodiversity.
  • evaluate the impacts of humans on biodiversity and ecosystem function.
  • apply the scientific method to biological problems and data, and evaluate the validity of biological information as applied to personal and community issues.

BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and MATH 100 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Biology 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a general biology course focusing on a survey of the plant and animal kingdoms. The course covers the general principles of biology including: methods of science, cell organization, genetics, evolution, ecology, biodiversity, and anatomy. These principles are explored in more depth through the examination of additional topics which may include: disease and epidemiology, physiological ecology, animal behavior, biotechnology, population growth and regulation, ecosystem ecology, and conservation biology. Evolution and biodiversity are continuing themes included in each major topic. The course is designed for non-science majors and is especially useful for liberal studies, elementary education, environmental studies, recreation, and similar majors. Field trips scheduled outside of class time (including day-length weekend field trips) may be required. Students may be required to purchase eye protection and disposable gloves.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the various metabolic, cellular, anatomical, morphological, physiological, and behavioral mechanisms evolved by organisms to acclimate or adapt to their environments.
  • apply the scientific method to simple experiments designed and conducted by students.
  • assemble the emergent properties of life, and describe each as they relate to different organisms.
  • explain the importance of ecology and evolution to organismal diversity.
  • evaluate the use of biotechnology in current fields (e.g. agriculture, medicine, and criminal investigations) based on a student's understanding of DNA and heredity.
  • research human interactions with the environment, and recommend sustainable practices that could be practically implemented.

BIOL 310 General Biology

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and MATH 100 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Biology 300, 307 and 310 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the major concepts of biological science with an emphasis on human biology. It is intended for non-science majors and disciplines requiring a broad overview of Biology (e.g. some Allied Health programs). Topics covered include: cell biology, metabolism, Mendelian and molecular genetics, evolution, anatomy and physiology, animal behavior, and ecology. The laboratory activities are designed to further investigate and illuminate each topic area. Students may be required to purchase eye protection and disposable gloves. Field trips outside of class time may be required. Additionally, students may be required to provide their own transportation to field trip sites.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain how human bodies function and maintain homeostasis at the cellular, anatomical, and physiological levels using correct biological vocabulary.
  • describe the processes of heredity, reproduction, and development, and discuss how the three are applied in modern biotechnologies.
  • explain the principles of evolution, ecology, and biodiversity, and apply an understanding of each concept to how humans interact with our environment.
  • apply the scientific method to biological problems, and interpret scientific data in a reasonable manner.
  • critically evaluate the validity of scientific information from a variety of sources.

BIOL 323 Plants and People

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and MATH 100; with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This introductory course focuses on the scientific study of the interactions between plants and humans. Students will use the scientific method to investigate the ecological and biological traits of plants, how these traits have shaped multicultural human use, and how plants have been affected by humans. Topics include plant anatomy, structure, and reproduction; the role of biodiversity in natural and cultivated systems; plant evolution under domestication; sustainable use of resources; ethical issues surrounding plant use; and comparison of plant use by various cultures for food, medicine, shelter, and dyes. Laboratory topics may include plant identification, experimental investigation of medicinal and food value of selected plants, traditional preparation of selected plants, plant structure and anatomy, and analysis of plant fibers and dyes. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the scientific method to test the medicinal and food value of selected plant parts or plant extracts, and assess the scientific support for specific plant supplements.
  • describe the anatomy, morphology, and function of the vegetative and reproductive plant organs, and identify vegetative modifications, flower parts, and fruit types of flowering plants.
  • explain how plants have evolved under domestication, and interpret and evaluate multiple lines of evidence connecting domesticated plants to their wild relatives.
  • compare and contrast uses of plants from many cultures (including, but not necessarily limited to modern and indigenous African, Eurasian, and North and South American societies) and relate the uses to the ecological constraints on the environment.
  • use dichotomous keys to identify native plants, describe the ethnobotanical significance of native plants, and prepare herbarium specimens to document specimens.
  • research human interactions with the environment, and recommend sustainable practices that could be practically implemented.

BIOL 350 Environmental Biology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of ecosystems and natural resources. Major topics covered include scientific methods, data interpretation, ecological principles, ecosystem functioning, conservation biology, resource use (including historical and cultural values) and management, and human-caused environmental impacts (e.g. pollution). This course provides the background needed to understand major global and regional issues such as acid rain, global warming, hazardous waste disposal, deforestation, ecological sustainability, and endangered species recovery. BIOL 350 is a general education course that is especially useful for Environmental Technology, Environmental Sciences, Ecology, Recreation, Education, and Political Science majors. You cannot enroll in this course if you have passed ENVT 304. One off-campus field trip is required. Students may be required to drive themselves and there may be entrance fees to certain field trip locations. Attendance at public meetings, and/or a semester project may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the principles of ecology and conservation to the analysis of natural resource management and use.
  • evaluate how the current and past world views impact local, regional, and global environmental issues.
  • use the scientific method to pose questions and interpret data relevant to conservation issues.
  • predict effects of consumer actions, government policies, and worldwide practices on the future sustainability and needs of society.

BIOL 380 Natural History Field Studies: Coastal Ecosystems

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will study the ecology and natural history of coastal ecosystems covered in the field. Animals, plants, geology, and environmental impacts unique to coastal areas will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. Assignments, field notes and appropriate exams will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 382 Natural History Field Studies: Desert Ecosystems

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will study the ecology and natural history of desert and arid ecosystems covered in the field. Animals, plants, geology, and environmental impacts unique to desert-related areas will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. Assignments, field notes and appropriate exams will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 384 Natural History Field Study of Forest Ecosystems

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will cover the ecology and natural history of forest ecosystems covered in the field. Animals, plants, geology, and environmental impacts unique to forest and mountain areas will be studied and their interrelationship investigated. Assignments, field notes and appropriate exams/quizzes will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. Additional fees for tours or transportation may also be required. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 386 Natural History Field Studies: Marine Ecosystems

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will cover the ecology and natural history of marine ecosystems in the field. Animals, plants, geology, and environmental impacts unique to ocean areas will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. Assignments, field notes and appropriate exams/quizzes will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 388 Natural History Field Studies: River Ecosystems

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will study the ecology and natural history of river ecosystems covered in the field. Animals, plants, geology, and environmental impacts unique to rivers and riparian areas will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. Assignments, field notes, and appropriate exams/quizzes will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 389 Natural History Field Studies: Wetland Ecosystems

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will study the ecology and natural history of wetland ecosystems covered in the field. Animals, plants, geology, and environmental impacts unique to wetland areas will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. Assignments, field notes and appropriate exams/quizzes will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 48 hours LEC; 9 - 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will study ecology and natural history covered in the field. Animals, plants, and geology will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. The course may be offered in the mountains, desert, or seashore and ocean. Assignments, field notes, and appropriate exams/quizzes will be an integral part of the course. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging or camping equipment and meals. Campsites will be available. Additional fees for tours or transportation may also be required. This course is ideal for anyone interested in nature, environmental topics, and the biological sciences. Teachers and resource managers seeking professional growth, and students from all academic disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze a proposed development plan and determine the potential impacts to the environment that may occur if the plan is approved.
  • explore career options as a professional naturalist, park ranger, or biological technician.
  • engage in a professional or non-professional teaching capacity by writing lesson plans, designing field trips, and preparing lecture presentations to teach about the significance of delicate ecosystems to human life.
  • describe the economic value of the development and maintenance of refuges, preserves, and sanctuaries, and in turn make informed decisions about the importance of their existence.

BIOL 392 Principles of Heritage Interpretation

  • Same As:ANTH 392 and HIST 392
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This interdisciplinary course covers the basics of interpreting historical, cultural, and natural resources to the general public. Interpretation is a communication process that forges emotional and intellectual connections between the interests of the audience and the inherent meanings of the resource. Topics include developing an interpretive program using a thematic approach and learning program delivery techniques. Completion of this course will qualify students to apply for professional certification through the National Association for Interpretation as a Certified Interpretive Guide (CIG). This course is recommended for students interested in history, biology, anthropology, recreation, education, and communication. Not open to students who have received credit for Anthropology 392 or History 392. This course requires field trips.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define heritage interpretation.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the history, principles, and philosophy of interpretation as it is practiced in natural resource settings (parks and forests) and a variety of other settings (museums, nature centers, zoos, arboretums, planetariums, aquariums, botanical gardens, historic sites, etc...).
  • compose interpretive themes, goals, and objectives.
  • research, outline, and develop an interpretive presentation.

BIOL 400 Principles of Biology

  • Units:5
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:CHEM 400 with a grade of "C" or better; AND Intermediate Algebra (Math 120 or the equivalent)
  • Advisory:CHEM 401; AND: ENGWR 101 AND ENGRD 110 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID BIOL 190; Part of C-ID BIOL 135S
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces universal biological principles, including biological molecules, enzymes, cell structure and function, biochemistry, Mendelian and molecular genetics, ecology and evolution. BIOL 400 is recommended for science majors and students in pre-professional programs. Goggles and a scientific or 4 function calculator are required (programmable or cell phone calculators are NOT allowed).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • formulate hypotheses, propose and conduct scientific tests of these hypotheses utilizing basic biological laboratory skills, and organize, evaluate and interpret biological data.
  • identify the structural characteristics of biological molecules and cellular organelles and relate these features to their functions in cells and organisms.
  • explain how cells obtain and use energy, how metabolism and movement are conducted and regulated, and how prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells differ in structure.
  • explain the underlying mechanisms of heredity and genetic change, how these mechanisms allow for evolution, natural selection and adaptation, and how biological evolution explains the adaptation, diversity, unity and history of life.
  • identify the abiotic and biotic factors, including human activities, that influence the abundance and distribution of organisms, the structure of biological communities, and the functioning of ecosystems.

BIOL 410 Principles of Botany

  • Units:5
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:BIOL 400 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and MATH 120 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID BIOL 155; Part of C-ID BIOL 135S
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the biology of plants, fungi, cyanobacteria, and algae. Topics covered include the morphology, anatomy, physiology, development, classification, evolution, and ecology of botanical organisms and other non-botanical organisms traditionally included in an introductory botany course for biology majors. Students may be required to purchase eye protection and disposable gloves. Additionally, students may be required to provide their own transportation to field trip sites.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the morphology, anatomy, physiology, development, classification, ecology, and evolution of non-metazoan organisms.
  • apply laboratory skills to solve biological problems of a botanical, ecological, or evolutionary nature.
  • integrate botanical knowledge with knowledge gained from previous biology courses.
  • evaluate the design of laboratory experiments performed in class, and those published in peer-reviewed literature; and suggest reasonable improvements or modifications.

BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology

  • Units:5
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:BIOL 400 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID BIOL 150; Part of C-ID BIOL 135S
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is part of a three-semester sequence in general biology for biology majors. Topics include zoology with particular emphasis on comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrates and invertebrates. The basic principles of evolution, taxonomy, embryology, morphology, physiology, behavior and ecology will be covered. Students may be required to purchase eye protection and disposable gloves. Field trips scheduled outside of class time may be required. Additionally, students may be required to provide their own transportation to field trip sites.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze adaptations to environmental pressures and the evolutionary causes of the diversity and unity of animal life.
  • synthesize and analyze major patterns of animal classification and taxonomy and describe the features of major animal phyla.
  • differentiate anatomical structures and describe their physiological functions.
  • formulate hypotheses, design investigation methods, collect and analyze data, and evaluate these elements of others' work, using appropriate scientific methodology.

BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology

  • Units:5
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:CHEM 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:BIOL 310 and ENGWR 101, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:Part of C-ID BIOL 115S
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course in which the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology are presented in an integrated fashion. This course covers anatomical terminology, basic organic chemistry, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Both BIOL 430 and BIOL 431 must be taken to study all of the major body systems. Purchase of personal protective equipment including lab coats, safety glasses, and disposable gloves is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the unique and overlapping roles of each body system in promoting necessary life functions and maintaining homeostasis, and assess how lifestyle choices, environmental conditions, and genetics impact role performance.
  • generate and interpret oral and written communication about the human body using knowledge of anatomy and physiology terminology and graphics.
  • analyze novel or complex scenarios and collaborate in creative problem solving using knowledge of the concept of complementarity of form and function and of how the body operates and is regulated from the cellular to the organismal level.
  • evaluate anatomy and physiology related information from various sources and apply findings to decision making.
  • differentiate structural elements, including natural anatomic variations and patterns of organization, and analyze physiologic conditions, using appropriate laboratory methods.

BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology

  • Units:5
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:BIOL 430 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:Part of C-ID BIOL 115S
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course in which the basic principles of human anatomy and physiology are presented in an integrated fashion. This course covers the circulatory, respiratory, urinary, immune, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Both BIOL 430 and BIOL 431 must be taken to study all of the major body systems. Purchase of personal protective equipment including lab coats, safety glasses, and disposable gloves is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate higher levels of mastery of the following student learning outcomes begun in BIOL 430.
  • generate and interpret oral and written communication about the human body using knowledge of anatomy and physiology terminology and graphics.
  • analyze novel or complex scenarios and collaborate in creative problem solving using knowledge of the concept of complementarity of form and function and of how the body operates and is regulated from the cellular to the organismal level.
  • evaluate anatomy and physiology related information from various sources and apply findings to decision making.
  • differentiate structural elements, including natural anatomic variations and patterns of organization, and analyze physiologic conditions, using appropriate laboratory methods.
  • evaluate the unique and overlapping roles of each body system in promoting necessary life functions and maintaining homeostasis, and assess how lifestyle choices, environmental conditions, and genetics impact role performance.

BIOL 439 Human Cadaver Dissection

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:BIOL 430 and 431 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The Human Cadaver Dissection course is a one-unit, intensive course for nursing, medical, chiropractic, physical therapy, sonography, or other health-related majors. Using a regional approach, students will study the structure of the human body through the dissection of cadavers. Students will gain experience in dissection techniques, more fully understand relationships between organs, and discuss physiological concepts as they pertain to anatomy. Maintaining a detailed lab notebook is an integral part of the course. A lab coat and safety glasses with side splash protection will be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop dissection techniques. Identify and utilize appropriate dissection technique and tools. Perform advanced dissections to prepare the specimens for study in other Biology courses.
  • identify anatomical structures and explore relationships between structure and function. Investigate human anatomy from superficial to deep structures. Discuss physiological concepts based on anatomical relationships.

BIOL 440 General Microbiology

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:CHEM 305 or CHEM 400 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent high school chemistry.
  • Advisory:BIOL 307, BIOL 310, and ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the concepts of microbiology with an emphasis on forms, modes of growth, cell specialization, mutual, commensal and parasitic relationships of bacteria, fungi, molds, protozoa and viruses. Topics will be correlated with medical and health applications to animals and human beings. Students are required to purchase a laboratory coat, microscope slides, safety glasses, disposable gloves and a laboratory notebook. Field trips and/or a semester project may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply microbiological concepts to current issues in human health, biotechnology, and infectious diseases.
  • analyze how the human body interacts with various microorganisms through symbiotic relationships and defense mechanisms.
  • evaluate the role various microbes play in epidemiology and analyze methods used to control the spread of such disease.
  • employ appropriate lab techniques to aseptically culture, transfer, observe, identify and manipulate microorganisms.

BIOL 442 General Microbiology and Public Health

  • Units:5
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:CHEM 305, 306, or 400 with a grade of "C" or better; Or one year high school chemistry with a laboratory with a grade "C" or better.
  • Advisory:BIOL 307, BIOL 310, or ENGWR 101, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a survey of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and helminths that are associated with human infectious diseases. It examines their cellular and molecular structure, physiology, metabolism, and genetics. Laboratory work introduces methods for cultivating and characterizing microorganisms. Topics will be related to global public health issues both past and present. Students are required to purchase a laboratory coat, microscope slides, safety glasses, disposable gloves and a laboratory notebook. Field trips and/or a semester project may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply microbiological concepts to current issues in human health, biotechnology, and infectious diseases.
  • analyze how the human body interacts with various microorganisms through symbiotic relationships and defense mechanisms.
  • evaluate how physical and chemical methods can be used to control microbial growth.
  • conduct experiments involving culture and transfer of microbes, microscopy, biochemical tests, DNA techniques, and diagnostic media.
  • evaluate the impact of various infectious diseases, including descriptions of the causative agent(s), signs and symptoms, pathogenesis, virulence factors, epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

BIOL 495 Independent Studies in Biology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

BIOL 498 Work Experience in Biology

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of Biology. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.

Biology - Field Studies (BIOLFS)

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics icon

This program is part of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics meta-major.

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Public Service, Health, and Education

Public Service, Health, and Education icon

This program is part of the Public Service, Health, and Education meta-major.

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