Communication & Media Studies

Communication (COMM)

COMM 301 Introduction to Public Speaking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course prepares students to speak in a variety of rhetorical situations: academic, professional, social, and political. Students will demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal delivery, ethical research methodology, analytical thinking and listening skills, organization and outlining skills, and appropriate presentation skills. In order to effectively assess oral communication competency, each student will complete a minimum of 22 minutes of evaluated speaking time. Emphasis is on researching, preparing, organizing, writing and presenting a variety of speeches for different audiences. Video recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the basic principles of human communication.
  • analyze the communication situation, audience, occasion, purpose and selection of subject matter.
  • formulate through research, analysis, and organization of material, oral presentations to inform, to persuade, and to mark a special occasion.
  • compose formal written outlines that reflect fully developed, logically structured, and unified oral presentations.
  • evaluate presentations for the purpose of demonstrating active listening,critical thinking and effective communication skills, both as speakers and as listeners.
  • explain and demonstrate the ethical responsibilities between speaker and audience within the communication transaction.

COMM 305 Oral Interpretation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:COMM 301 or ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the field of performance studies through the oral interpretation of various literary genres, including Western and Non-Western literature. The focus is on audience analysis, selection and thematic analysis of literature, script writing, discussion and application of vocal and physiological delivery techniques, program performance, and post-performance evaluation. Theoretical issues and historical developments are examined and applied to the current performance trends in solo, duo and interpreters' theatre.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify historical and theoretical foundations in the field of oral interpretation.
  • analyze and assess a variety of Western and non-Western literary works, including poetry, prose, and drama, for inclusion in a performance script.
  • illustrate the importance of narration and dialogue through the performance of unified, coherent and thematically driven literary scripts.
  • demonstrate a range of verbal and non-verbal communication techniques to bring the literature to life and heighten the effectiveness of the performer's message.
  • compose individual and/or group oral presentations appropriate to the message, the audience and the context.

COMM 311 Argumentation and Debate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:COMM 301
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers both the theory and practice of argumentation and debate. Students will learn to effectively develop and respond to reasoned written and oral arguments, to critically evaluate various types of evidence, to identify fallacies in reasoning and language, and to advocate within the structures of formal debate and public advocacy. Students will develop critical thinking and communication skills necessary to advance a cogent, cohesive argument in support of a proposition, as well as defend and refute arguments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate the nature and function of argumentation in various communication contexts.
  • assess rhetorical style differences and choose appropriate strategies for the composition and delivery of oral versus written argument.
  • analyze, compare, and evaluate divergent perspectives within complex social controversies.
  • detect fallacies in reasoning as they occur in oral, written and visual text.
  • manage a variety of information technologies to gather, evaluate, and assess evidence to be used in support of a proposition.
  • construct and deliver a cohesive, cogent argument in support of a proposition in both written and oral communication contexts.
  • critique written and oral arguments using Aristotle's classical structures of reasoning and Stephen Toulmin's contemporary elements of argument.
  • demonstrate ethical behavior in the research, construction and delivery of arguments.

COMM 315 Persuasion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 190
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course presents fundamental theories and techniques of persuasion as they occur in various communication contexts, including commercial, interpersonal, public, and mass media. Students develop critical thinking skills by engaging in oral and written analysis, evaluation, and composition of persuasive messages and by examining the personal, political, cultural, and social impacts of persuasion. Students explore ethical considerations of persuasive communication, learn about types of reasoning, and identify fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasion. Students will write a minimum of 6,000 written words in a variety of essay formats.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critique persuasive strategies as they exist in a variety of contexts (e.g., public speaking, advertising, politics, media), including use in propaganda and subliminal techniques.
  • differentiate between humanistic and social science theoretical approaches to persuasion.
  • analyze persuasive messages, including identifying and explaining the persuasive components or strategies used to effect change.
  • distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning and identify fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasive communication.
  • evaluate and determine criteria for the development of successful persuasive campaigns.
  • design persuasive campaigns including the development of appropriate assessment strategies to determine effectiveness.
  • construct and deliver ethical persuasive messages directed toward a defined audience.
  • apply ethical criteria to persuasive appeals (e.g., legal, religious, political, human nature, situational, dialogical).

COMM 321 Interpersonal Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students in this course will explore and apply communication concepts associated with developing and maintaining satisfying interpersonal relationships. Through a variety of class activities, students experiment with various approaches to successful communication in interpersonal contexts, including conflict management and active listening. Additionally, students will improve communication competency through a heightened awareness of the complexity of interpersonal communication and the development of skills as both senders and receivers of shared messages.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the various models of communication and explain how messages may be sent and received at both conscious and unconscious levels.
  • describe ways that communication creates, develops and changes personal identities; explain the effect of communication on personal identities.
  • describe the effects of communication on interpersonal relationships and social and cultural realities.
  • demonstrate an understanding of ethical interpersonal communication founded on communication theory and research.
  • demonstrate active listening through the use of paraphrasing, authentic questions, and non-defensive responses to criticism.
  • diagnose conflict in interpersonal relationships and demonstrate appropriate conflict resolution methods
  • explain the process of human perception and its influence on interpersonal communication.

COMM 325 Intercultural Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 with a grade of ‘C’ or better; or placement into ENGWR 101 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the challenges and promises of intercultural communications in the United States. Variations and commonalities in communication patterns across cultures are examined as well as processes and outcomes among persons of different group-based experiential backgrounds. Practical application of factors which influence communication among individuals of different cultures is emphasized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the components of culture and communication, including cultural values, the deep structures of culture, and communication behaviors that are affected by cultural differences.
  • recognize and explain commonly accepted taxonomies for describing cultural variability, communication styles, and cultural influence upon verbal and nonverbal language usage.
  • compare and choose socially appropriate behaviors in specific intercultural situations requiring behavioral flexibility, tolerance for ambiguity, social relaxation.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the basic skills for communicating with people from different cultures and recognize barriers to effective intercultural competencies, such as stereotyping, racism, prejudice, and ethnocentrism.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the patterns of information exchange among major global regions and the role of governments.
  • identify major contributions from the fields of social and behavioral science and apply these findings to the study of intercultural communication.

COMM 331 Group Discussion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Group communication is pervasive in all academic, professional, and social environments. This course is designed to increase students’ understanding of group communication and to prepare students to function more effectively in various types of groups. Students will learn about the dynamics of group roles, the multiple functions of groups, leadership styles, conflict management, problem-solving, and decision-making. Individual and group presentations are required. Video recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate small group from other communication contexts by definition, characteristics, and theoretical perspectives.
  • identify the phases of group development including the establishment of group norms and roles.
  • articulate the role and influence of diversity on small group communication and problem-solving.
  • design and deliver effective verbal and non-verbal messages utilizing both informative and persuasive group and individual presentation formats.
  • critique and model active listening and appropriate feedback to create and maintain positive group climates.
  • recognize and apply ethical standards to conflict management, group problem-solving and decision making, including the discovery and evaluation of research used in the support of a proposition.
  • assess the value of leadership in groups utilizing a variety of theoretical approaches to leadership styles, ethical behavior and power dynamics.

COMM 341 Organizational Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to allow students to examine both theoretical and pragmatic essentials of effective organizational messages from preparation and presentation to effective observation and analysis. Students will explore the dynamics of organizational communications in various situations including conflict negotiation teams and problem solving/decision making groups. The dynamics of leadership and communication will be explored. Current techniques of evaluating organizational communication for the purpose of improving organizational effectiveness will also be examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze various organizational communication networks using a variety of theoretical perspectives.
  • assess the influences of globalization, cultural diversity, and outsourcing on an organization's culture and communication climate.
  • implement and analyze conflict management strategies.
  • recognize and evaluate effective team-building strategies.
  • compose ideas clearly in effective, appropriate and well-organized written messages.
  • compare and evaluate the various theoretical perspectives of leadership.
  • identify, describe, and demonstrate communication strategies that will increase communication competence and effectiveness in an organizational setting.

COMM 351 Mass Media and Society

  • Same As:JOUR 310
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID JOUR 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The class will offer a survey of the mass media: history, philosophy, structure and trends, as well as theories, which help to explain effects and the importance of media as a social institution. The course will explore economics, technology, law, ethics, and social issues, including cultural and ethnic diversity. This course is the same as JOUR 310; only one of these courses may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the purposes, functions, and scope of mass media in society today.
  • recognize the influence and role of technology in affecting mass media content and the impact it has on society.
  • develop critical thinking skills to analyze media’s influence.
  • explain the principles and laws of freedom of speech and press.
  • identify the major mass media.
  • understand the development/history of the mass media in the United States.
  • demonstrate a general understanding of legal responsibilities of the mass media, including areas of libel, privacy, pornography, copyright and freedom of information.
  • understand global media trends.

COMM 361 The Communication Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and skills necessary for effective interpersonal, small group and public communication. Course content includes an emphasis on both communication theory and practice by providing students with the opportunity to develop communication competency through a variety of presentation formats. Special emphasis is placed on practical experiences within groups, facilitation of interpersonal relationships, as well as message design and delivery for multiple purposes and to diverse audiences. In order to effectively assess oral communication competency, each student will complete a minimum of 22 minutes of evaluated speaking time. Videotaping may be required for this course. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply a variety of theories relative to interpersonal, small group, and public communication.
  • utilize verbal and non-verbal communication strategies to increase effectiveness in interpersonal relationships, group interactions and public presentations.
  • demonstrate effective listening skills to comprehend spoken messages, analyze information critically and consider multiple perspectives.
  • assess the impact of intercultural communication on various aspects of communication.
  • employ a variety of conflict management strategies within interpersonal and group communication contexts.
  • construct and extemporaneously deliver oral presentations to varying audiences, utilizing and appropriately documenting research from various sources.
  • apply ethical standards to research and advocacy.

COMM 363 Introduction to Communication Theory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

A survey of the discipline of communication studies with emphasis on multiple epistemological, theoretical, and methodological issues relevant to the systematic inquiry and pursuit of knowledge about human communication. This course explores the basic history, assumptions, principles, processes, variables, methods, and specializations of human communication as an academic field of study.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the history of the study of human communication.
  • explain and apply the basic concepts of the field of communication.
  • demonstrate a basic knowledge of the specializations comprising the communication discipline.
  • analyze human communication as a process according to theories which vary from one communication context to another.
  • compare and contrast the basic research methods for the evaluation of human communication phenomena.
  • critically discuss and write about human communication theories and events.
  • demonstrate an understanding of ethical perspectives in communication.

COMM 373 Forensics Laboratory

  • Units:2
  • Hours:108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 160B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Through individualized instruction and participation in public speaking events, academic debate, literature interpretation, public campaigns, and/or training presentations, students will develop listening skills, organization skills, and the ability to recognize matters of political, social, and economic importance. This course helps students develop their skills as critical thinkers and competent speakers. This is a laboratory course giving practice in preparing for and participating in the Student Speaker's Bureau and/or Intercollegiate Forensics competition. Areas of interest may include debate, persuasive speaking, oral interpretation of literature, impromptu speaking, expository speaking, readers' theater, training presentations and campaign development. Field trips to tournaments or other speaking events may be required. The course may be taken four times for a maximum of eight units.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • adapt principles of effective communication to a variety of competitive and/or public communication contexts: debate, public address; literature interpretation, training presentations, and public campaigns.
  • construct arguments on issues of political, social, and economic importance for a variety of competitive and/or public contexts.
  • employ critical listening skills in order to defend or revise an argumentative position.
  • critique both written and oral presentations.
  • compose arguments and messages with the audience's attitudes, values, and beliefs in mind.

COMM 494 Topics in Communication

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

A survey of contemporary communication topics that allows students to choose a particular option from several. Possible options may include, but are not limited to: extemporaneous speaking, intercultural communication in the workplace, communication in the classroom, conflict, principles of visual communication, readers' theatre, parliamentary procedure and decision making techniques. Students may receive one unit of credit in each topic area. Consult class schedule for specific topics offered.


COMM 495 Independent Studies in Communication

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

COMM 498 Work Experience in Communication and Media Studies

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of Communication and Media Studies. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.