Geography

Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates the interrelationships between Earth and humans, with an emphasis on natural systems (solar energy balance, weather and climate, water resources, landforms, natural hazards, vegetation, and soil). Relevant application of these elements to today's world is stressed to help students better understand Earth's physical environment as well as human-environment interaction. A field trip may be required to relate class discussions to the real world. Students are encouraged to take the lab course (GEOG 301) concurrently. Consult a counselor to determine whether enrollment in the lab course is necessary.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess how the receipt of solar energy and interaction of Earth's four major systems (the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere) creates our planet's diverse physical environment.
  • use the scientific method and course experiences to formulate explanations for geographic variation in energy receipt, temperature, precipitation, weather and climate, vegetation, natural hazards, and landforms.
  • evaluate aspects of human-environment interaction.
  • discuss the role of humans in modifying Earth's physical environment as well as the environment's role in shaping human activities.
  • apply geography problem solving skills to real world problems.

GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 111
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides "hands-on" study of the basic principles and concepts involved in understanding Earth's physical environment. Lab topics include observation, measurement and analysis of Earth's energy balance, weather and climate, vegetation, landforms, and natural hazards, as well as topographic map reading, interpretation, and navigation skills. Field trips and spatial data collection activities may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • effectively use and interpret geographic data.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the utility of applied geography skills.
  • apply basic geography skills such as mapping, map interpretation, data collection, data analysis, measuring and instrumentation.
  • explain geographic processes which act upon and shape Earth's physical environment.

GEOG 306 Weather and Climate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:MATH 100
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to atmospheric processes including energy and moisture exchanges, atmospheric pressure, winds, and global circulation. Severe weather conditions such as hurricanes and tornadoes are also studied. World, regional, and local climates are investigated. Student work will include weather observations and analysis of atmospheric data using charts, weather maps and radar and satellite imagery from the Internet and other sources. Because this course involves the use of some quantitative concepts, students are encouraged to have fundamental algebraic skills prior to enrolling in the course. Students may be required to attend a field trip and purchase a calculator for this course

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the dynamics of the energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system.
  • compare and contrast the forces that cause atmospheric motion as they relate to wind systems and the global circulation.
  • analyze moisture and precipitation processes.
  • analyze the dynamics of severe weather systems.
  • analyze and map atmospheric data.
  • classify and interpret atmospheric data in order to describe variation in climate over the Earth's surface.

GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates the diverse patterns of human settlement, development, and movement on earth, which evolved as a result of cultural and environmental factors. Emphasis is placed on understanding global population and migration patterns, language, religion, ethnicity, political and economic systems, development issues, agriculture and urbanization.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze human's role in transforming Earth's surface into a series of distinctive cultural landscapes.
  • propose explanations for the geographic origin and global diffusion of key aspects of culture (e.g. language, religion, ethnicity, development, agriculture, urbanization).
  • demonstrate an understanding of cultural diversity in California, the U.S., and the world by becoming more aware of broad historical and modern global socioeconomic processes such as migration, colonization, and globalization.
  • create maps from various types of socioeconomic data and demonstrate an understanding of key geographic concepts by analyzing and explaining the spatial pattern represented.

GEOG 322 Geography of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the natural and cultural environments of California, with special emphasis on the interaction of people with landforms, climate, natural vegetation, soils and resources. Historical, political, and economic development within this diverse environment is presented. The diversity of cultures which make up the state's expanding population are studied and compared. Analysis of relevant issues of the day including those based on ethnic and cultural differences form an integral part of this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • have students describe the physical and cultural environments existing within the state of California.
  • critically assess the cultural and landscape interrelationships that have contributed to the historical, political, and economic development of the state.
  • compare and contrast the contributions made by the various ethnic and cultural groups which comprise the state's population.
  • evaluate patterns of social problems within the state, which are based on economic inequalities and ethnic and cultural differences.

GEOG 330 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 155
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

A Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer-based data processing tool used to manage and analyze spatial information. Applications of GIS include environmental assessment, analysis of natural hazards, management of municipal networks, business and industry site analysis, resource management and land-use planning. This course introduces the concepts, techniques, and tools of GIS including spatial data capture, management and analysis, as well as cartographic output through hands-on experience using GIS software. Students may be required to purchase GIS software and a flash drive in order to complete this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the components of a GIS.
  • demonstrate comprehension of GIS analysis.
  • identify public and private sector business applications for GIS.
  • demonstrate basic skills in GIS including data capture, data analysis, and mapping output.
  • assess appropriate applications of GIS analysis.

GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:50 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:GEOG 300; CISC 300 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the exciting world of maps (both hard-copy and digital) and the geographic techniques and technologies that are utilized in the creation of modern cartographic documents. The examination of cartographic constructs, basic statistics, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Internet mapping, remote sensing, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will shed light on this interesting and rapidly changing area of spatial inquiry. A portable USB storage device may be required for this class. Short field activities may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • determine basic geographic information (e.g. location, distance and direction) using various map scales, coordinate systems, and projections.
  • create, analyze, critique, and interpret data using maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery.
  • demonstrate basic proficiency in traditional and technology-based cartographic skills.
  • collect, import and display geospatial data within a GIS.
  • critically analyze mapping applications and technologies commonly used in today's society.

GEOG 332.1 Introduction to Desktop GIS

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) which are systems of computers and people used to integrate spatial data for informed decision making. Topics may include analysis of environmental, economic, political, social, health care, and transportation data. Using desktop GIS software (such as ArcGIS) students will learn GIS skills including identifying zones, measuring distances, calculating areas, integrating spatial data and displaying output. This course will also cover basic software functionality, database construction, and management. This course is the first of a two-part series.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the components of the graphical user interface including data frames, tables, charts, layouts, and scripts.
  • construct a spatial database using the GIS software.
  • analyze relationships between spatial elements in a GIS and produce printed output using GIS software.
  • compare methods for querying spatial data tables.
  • associate values in separate tables using "join" and "relate" table functions.

GEOG 332.2 Intermediate Desktop GIS

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:GEOG 332.1 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:CISC 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are computer-based mapping programs that analyze spatial data. This course builds on the conceptual and practical foundations covered in GEOG 332.1 by further exploring the capabilities and functionality of desktop GIS software. Emphasis will be placed on GIS software functionality, address geocoding, beginning spatial database construction, spatial data management, spatial analysis, and cartographic presentation. This course is the second of a 2-part series.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze complex spatial relationships using desktop GIS.
  • identify selected spatial regions using various command functions.
  • measure length, radius, diameter, and area using various geospatial processing tools.
  • query multiple spatial data tables simultaneously using spatial joins.
  • compare raster and vector data structures and evaluate the appropriate applications of each.
  • create spatial data using the software.

GEOG 334 Introduction to GIS Software Applications

  • Units:3
  • Hours:50 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 300, GEOG 330, or GEOG 331
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are computer-based mapping programs that analyze spatial data. This course provides the foundation for using desktop GIS software. A conceptual overview along with hands-on experience will be used to explore basic GIS software functionality. Emphasis will be placed on display characteristics, attribute querying, database exploration and management, spatial analysis, data creation, and cartographic presentation. A portable USB storage device is required and should be provided by the student. Not open to students who have completed GEOG 332.2

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and utilize the components of the software graphical user interface including the table of contents, basic tools, tables, charts, and data and layout views.
  • compile and manage spatial data including spatial data statistical classification methods.
  • perform attribute and spatial queries.
  • correlate values in separate tables using "join" and "relate" functions.
  • create spatial data and produce maps using GIS software.
  • analyze spatial relationships between map features.

GEOG 344 Spatial Analysis and Modeling in GIS

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:GEOG 330 or 331 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a survey of the various concepts, approaches, and tools involved in the analysis and modeling of spatial data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Emphasis is on the investigation of spatial distributions and relationships, and the methods used to answer spatial questions and solve spatial problems. Specific topics include statistical and spatial analysis, geoprocessing, spatial modeling, and map algebra. Additional topics include distance and density surfaces, cluster analysis, surface interpolation and resampling, hydrologic analysis, 3D display/animation, and regression analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify various spatial analysis techniques.
  • apply statistical measures to characterize geospatial data.
  • analyze geospatial distributions and relationships.
  • compare and contrast various approaches to spatial modeling.
  • design and create spatial models.

GEOG 350 Data Acquisition in GIS

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:GEOG 330 or 331 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the techniques, theory, and practical experience necessary to acquire, convert, and create digital spatial data. Topics include acquisition of existing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data, metadata, formatting and conversion of GIS data, creating data utilizing digital cameras and scanners, the utilization of remotely sensed data, and use of the Global Positioning System (GPS).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the quality of existing spatial data.
  • distinguish between various geospatial data models and assess their suitabilities for specific applications.
  • acquire primary data using GPS and the Internet.
  • convert digital data from one format to another.
  • assemble GIS data sets, including raster data, into logical groups appropriate for specific applications.
  • prioritize and streamline data acquisition processes for GIS projects.

GEOG 390 Field Studies in Geography

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:3 - 24 hours LEC; 18 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:GEOG 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the field study of geographic principles and processes of specific areas (mountains, deserts, seashore, etc.). Course content will vary by destination. Topics may include physical geography, human geography, and/or geographic techniques such as the application of tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field trip(s) are required. For specific details, see the course description listed in the schedule. Students will be responsible for providing their own lodging (or camping equipment) and meals. At a minimum it is recommended that students be prepared to spend a full day in the field. This may require a day-pack, water container(s), food, foul weather gear, field notebook, clipboard, whistle, and personal safety gear (warm clothing, medications, cell phone, GPS, sunscreen, sunglasses, hiking shoes, and a hat).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply concepts and processes discussed in lecture to experiences in the field.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data.
  • examine the surrounding physical and/or human environment and formulate explanations for the geographic patterns and processes observed.
  • integrate geographic information from various disciplines (geology, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others) in order to explain landscape patterns and processes.

GEOG 393 Field Studies in Geography: Arid Landscapes

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:GEOG 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in arid environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and include introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply concepts and processes discussed in lecture to experiences in the field.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data
  • describe and explain geographic phenomena related to the particular physical and/or human environments under study.
  • integrate geographic information from various disciplines (geology, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others) in order to explain landscape patterns and processes.

GEOG 495 Independent Studies in Geography

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

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This program is part of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics meta-major.

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Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

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This program is part of the Liberal Arts and Social Sciences meta-major.

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