Geology

Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 300 Physical Geology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 301 is recommended. Students enrolled in GEOL 300 experience higher rates of success when concurrently enrolled in GEOL 301.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Physical geology is an introduction to the composition and dynamics of the Earth from the atomic scale of minerals to the global scale of plate tectonics. Topics include the composition of minerals and rock, volcanism, earth structures, earthquakes, erosion and surface processes, geologic time, geologic hazards, and plate tectonics. In this course, attention will focus on the rocks, landscapes, and scenic areas of the American West. Emphasis is placed on how humans affect the environment. Successful completion of physical geology prepares the student to recognize, understand, and appreciate processes which continually change our Earth.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze geologic principles and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  • evaluate the relationship among the three kinds of rocks.
  • explain and interpret geologic processes operating on and within the Earth.
  • recognize and appraise geologic hazards.
  • examine the importance, availability, and the sustainable use of geologic resources.
  • explain the scientific method and communicate complex course concepts effectively in writing and diagrams.

GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:GEOL 300; (or may be taken previously)
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOL 100L
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides laboratory experience with the tools and skills discussed in Physical Geology (GEOL 300). Lab topics include; mineral and rock identification, map and air photograph interpretation, landform identification, and the study and interpretation of geologic maps and cross-sections. A calculator, ruler, protractor, and GEOL 300 textbook may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • complete and evaluate the time-event sequence on a geologic column by evaluation with both relative and absolute time.
  • use geologic tools such as topographic maps, aerial/satellite photos, P and S wave models to compute gradient, construct geologic maps, interpret and evaluate geologic structures and landscapes.
  • identify, describe and interpret the physical properties of minerals and their chemical groupings.
  • identify and contrast the physical properties of the igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks.
  • compare, examine, and interpret topographic features produced by fluvial, groundwater, glacial, and wind processes.

GEOL 305 Earth Science

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:GEOL 306
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (No credit for GEOL 305 or 306 if taken after GEOL 300, 301, 310 or 311 )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOL 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introductory course covering major topics in geology, oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, scientific method, and philosophy of science. This course is designed for non-science majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the history and place of Earth in the solar system and universe using the scientific method and scientific principles.
  • compare and contrast the geology, atmospheres, compositions, and conditions of the planets and moons in our solar system and identify those conditions that make Earth ideal for its current life forms.
  • examine and evaluate systems and processes that operate in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and solid Earth.
  • examine how physical properties and processes such as buoyancy and convection drive Earth processes in the various earth sciences.
  • analyze how processes in the different earth sciences affect our local, regional, national, and global communities.
  • evaluate the impact of human activity on the physical environment of our planet.

GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:GEOL 305; (or may be taken previously)
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (No credit for GEOL 305 or 306 if taken after GEOL 300, 301, 310 or 311 )
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course emphasizes the scientific methods and systematic laboratory procedures of Earth sciences. Topics include weather analysis, rock and mineral identification, study of geologic concepts by means of topographic maps, astronomical observation and ocean dynamics. A field trip or an appropriate alternative activity will be required as an introduction to geological environments and field methods in geology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish specimens of rocks and minerals and explain their formation.
  • evaluate how various geological processes work to shape the topography of Earth.
  • assemble the basic observations necessary to make a weather prediction.
  • relate basic astronomical observations to common astronomical phenomena.
  • assess how oceanographic processes operate and interact with meteorological and geological processes.

GEOL 310 Historical Geology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:GEOL 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOL 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the origin and geologic history of the Earth and the evolution of its plant and animal inhabitants. Plate tectonic theory is used to explain changes in composition and structure of rocks of the Earth's crust from the formation of the Earth to the present. Emphasis is placed on the formation of sedimentary rocks and how the Earth's environment and processes changes are recorded. Evolution and extinction are studied to understand how they reflect environmental changes in the earth's ocean, atmosphere, and surface.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate relative and absolute age dating techniques as appropriate tools to establish Earth's natural history and geologic time.
  • assess theories of evolution and extinction and the logic and evidence leading to their development.
  • examine past environmental conditions on Earth to predict possible trends for Earth's future environment (climate trends, sea level, and atmospheric composition).
  • analyze how an active geologic environment produces characteristic features seen in stratigraphic records of past environments.
  • apply plate tectonic theory to formulate past, present, and future changes in configurations of continents, and the geologic features related to those changes.

GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:GEOL 310 (may be taken previously).
  • Advisory:GEOL 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOL 110L
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Laboratory studies will accompany and complement GEOL 310, Historical Geology. Use of sedimentary rocks, fossils, geologic maps, and cross sections will aid in interpreting ancient environments, tectonic settings, and geologic history. Other concepts addressed include age relations and correlation of rock and time units, and introduction to fossil identification and biostratigraphy. At least one field trip or an appropriate alternative activity will be required as an introduction to sedimentary environments and field methods in geology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain and practically apply the principles of the scientific method.
  • explain and practically apply knowledge of tectonic processes to interpret geologic events throughout geologic time.
  • interpret geologic maps, cross sections and stratigraphic columns.
  • practically apply the principles of relative dating to interpret sequences of geologic events.
  • communicate complex course concepts effectively in writing and diagrams.

GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course will provide an introduction to the basic principles and practices of oceanography. Topics will be presented in terms of the applications of physics, geology, chemistry, and biology to a study of the world's oceans. Specific topics will include planetary science and earth origin, the geologic timescale, geography and location systems, matter, marine provinces, sediments, seismology, plate tectonics, seawater composition, geochemical distributions, deep ocean circulation, winds and surface circulation, waves, tides, estuarine environments, biological production, necton, plankton, and benthic organisms. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand and apply the basic practices and principles of oceanography.
  • solve problems using basic chemical and physical principles.
  • analyze situations involving the oceans and its resources using scientific principles.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the causes of natural phenomena and increase the appreciation of the physical world.
  • relate how our lives and environment have been affected by marine processes.

GEOL 345 Geology of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOL 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a survey of the physical and historical aspects of California geology, emphasizing the linkage of geology and people through economic and social impacts. This course is recommended for non-majors and majors in geology and is of particular value to science, engineering, environmental studies, education, and economics majors. Field trips will be combined with lectures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the role of geologic processes within the framework of plate tectonics in the evolution of California's landscape.
  • appraise California's geologic resources, their distribution, use, and conservation.
  • analyze California's geologic hazards and assess their prediction and mitigation.
  • evaluate the continuing interaction of geology and humans in California.
  • describe the physiographic provinces of California in terms of rock types, age and tectonic development.
  • communicate complex course concepts effectively using written and diagrammatic explanations.

GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 32 hours LEC; 27 - 120 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:GEOL 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the study of geologic principles and processes of specific regions (mountains, deserts, great valley, coastal region, etc.). Course content varies according to field trip destination but may include topics in physical geology, environmental geology, economic geology, and/or introduction to tools and techniques used for Geoscience field research (e.g. map and compass, Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). For specific details, see the course topic description(s) listed in the schedule. Field excursions are required and students will be responsible for providing their own lodging (or camping equipment) and meals. This course may be repeated up to four times under a new topic or destination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply geologic concepts discussed in lecture to observed field conditions.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data.
  • examine the surrounding physical and/or human environment and formulate explanations for the geologic patterns and processes observed.
  • integrate geologic information with other disciplines (geography, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others), as appropriate, in order to develop a comprehensive view of landscapes and processes.

GEOL 495 Independent Studies in Geology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019