History

History (HIST)

HIST 307 History of World Civilizations to 1500

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of the development of world civilizations from antiquity to 1500 CE, with particular emphasis on the dynamic interaction and comparison of peoples and cultures. The focus is on the roles played by social, political, economic, cultural and religious forces in shaping the major world civilizations and the legacy of these civilizations within the world today.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct basic research of historical documents and publications, interpret primary and secondary sources, and utilize academic citations and formatting.
  • compose arguments, which evaluate evidence from historical sources and synthesize this evidence in support of a thesis statement and argumentative claims, reflecting writing competency at the college composition level.
  • explain the development of world civilizations incorporating perspectives of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • explain major social, political, economic, technological, and scientific developments, their causes and effects, and their historical significance to 1500 CE.
  • analyze the ways human groups have interacted through trade, warfare, migration, and biological exchange and how these developments have been affected by and have in turn affected the natural environment.
  • compare broad patterns of cultural change and exchange within complex societies and across regions, including cultural developments such as religion, philosophy, art, music, literature, and architecture.

HIST 308 History of World Civilizations, 1500 to Present

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of the development of the major civilizations of the world from the 16th century to the present, with particular emphasis on the dynamic interaction of peoples and cultures. The focus is on the role played by social, political, economic, cultural and religious forces in shaping the major world civilizations and the legacy of these civilizations within the world today.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct basic research of historical documents and publications, interpret primary and secondary sources, and utilize academic citations and formatting.
  • compose arguments, which evaluate evidence from historical sources and synthesize this evidence in support of a thesis statement and argumentative claims, reflecting writing competency at the college composition level.
  • explain the development of world civilizations incorporating perspectives of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • explain major social, political, economic, technological, and scientific developments, their causes and effects, and their historical significance from 1500 to the present.
  • analyze the ways human groups have interacted through trade, warfare, migration, and biological exchange and how these developments have been affected by and have in turn affected the natural environment.
  • compare broad patterns of cultural change and exchange within complex societies and across regions, including cultural developments such as religion, philosophy, art, music, literature, and architecture.

HIST 310 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or eligibility for ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course portrays the growth of the history of America from the pre-Columbian period to 1877 focusing on its institutions and ideals, examining the decisions and developments that shaped our national heritage. The U.S. Constitution and the establishment of American government institutions are also covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct basic research of historical documents and publications, interpret primary and secondary sources, and utilize academic citations and formatting.
  • compose arguments, which evaluate evidence from historical sources and synthesize this evidence in support of a thesis statement and argumentative claims, reflecting writing competency at the college composition level.
  • explain the development U.S. History incorporating perspectives of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • explain the major American social, cultural, economic, technological, and scientific developments, their causes and effects, and their historical significance.
  • describe America’s growth in a global context, and analyze the major political trends, attitudes, conflicts, and events—including both mainstream and reform efforts—and explain their historical significance.
  • explain the philosophical reasoning, the federal concept, and the democratic ideology in the development of the Constitution.

HIST 311 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or eligibility for ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course portrays America's development from the period of Reconstruction following the Civil War in 1865 to the present, examining the significant ideals, decisions, forces, institutions, individuals, events, and processes that affected continuity and change during this time. Coverage also includes California state and local government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct basic research of historical documents and publications, interpret primary and secondary sources, and utilize academic citations and formatting.
  • compose arguments, which evaluate evidence from historical sources and synthesize this evidence in support of a thesis statement and argumentative claims, reflecting writing competency at the college composition level.
  • explain the development of U.S. History incorporating perspectives of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • explain the major American social, cultural, economic, technological, and scientific developments, their causes and effects, and their historical significance.
  • describe America’s growth in a global context, and analyze the major political trends, attitudes, conflicts, and events—including both mainstream and reform efforts—and explain their historical significance.
  • describe the role of California state and local government and its impact on the nation as a whole.

HIST 312 History of the United States (to 1865)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or eligibility for ENGWR via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course portrays the growth of the history of America from the pre-Columbian period to 1865 focusing on its institutions and ideals, examining the decisions and developments that shaped our national heritage. The U.S. Constitution and the establishment of American government institutions are also covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate information literacy skills necessary to conduct basic research of historical documents, publications, and references.
  • compose historical writing assignments reflecting written expression competency at the college composition level.
  • critically analyze the chronology of events that make up our country’s past to understand change and/or continuity and cause and/or effect in history.
  • embody historical empathy by judging the past on its own terms and use that knowledge to understand contemporary issues.
  • demonstrate an understanding of U.S. history through multiple analytical categories such as race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical reasoning, the federal concept, and the democratic ideology in the development of the Constitution.

HIST 313 History of the United States (1865-1945)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or eligibility for ENGWR via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course portrays America's development from the period of Reconstruction following the Civil War in 1865 through the end of the Second World War in 1945, examining the significant ideals, decisions, forces, institutions, individuals, events, and processes that affected continuity and change during this time. Coverage also includes California state and local government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate information literacy competency skills necessary to conduct basic research of historical documents, publications, and references.
  • compose historical writing assignments reflecting written expression competency at the college composition level.
  • critically analyze the chronology of events that make up our country’s past to understand change and/or continuity and cause and/or effect in history.
  • embody historical empathy by judging the past on its own terms and use that knowledge to understand contemporary issues.
  • demonstrate an understanding of U.S. history through multiple analytical categories such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and development in a global context.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the role of California state and local government and its impact on the nation as a whole.

HIST 314 Recent United States History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course reviews those events that constitute our country's history from 1945 to the present, ensuing against the background of a "world setting." While the emphasis tends to be on political developments, the course also covers broad economic, social, and cultural patterns. It includes coverage of California state and local government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop and acquire information literacy competency skills necessary to conduct basic research of historical documents, publications, and references.
  • compose historical writing assignments reflecting written expression competency at the college composition level.
  • critically analyze the chronology of events that make up our country’s past to understand change and/or continuity and cause and/or effect in history.
  • embody historical empathy by judging the past on its own terms and use that knowledge to understand contemporary issues.
  • demonstrate an understanding of U.S. history through multiple analytical categories such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, and growth in a global context.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the impact of California on the nation as a whole.

HIST 319 American Environmental History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the past interactions between human society and the natural world in what is now the United States. Issues to be discussed include Native American resource management, the ecological effects of the arrival of Europeans in the "New World," resource exploitation in the industrial era, cultural constructions of nature, and the preservation, conservation, and environmental movements. In the context of the historical influence of nature upon human society and the impact of human society upon nature, the course covers broad political, social, and cultural patterns and conflicts. In the same context, it also includes multicultural interpretations of the California and Sierra Nevada foothill experience which may entail field trips.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the information literacy skills necessary to conduct basic historical research and compose historical writing assignments at the college composition level;
  • explain how political, economic, social, and cultural factors have shaped human interactions with and management of the North American environment;
  • analyze cultural encounters and conflicts between distinct societies with an emphasis on colonization (including the demographic impacts of disease) and westward expansion, as well as divergent and competing economic ideologies, land-use, and maritime practices;
  • identify key authors who helped reshape American attitudes towards the natural world and analyze how these works employed philosophical, scientific, gendered, racial, political, economic, and/or demographic approaches in their interpretations and arguments;
  • explain and analyze the environmental impacts of historically significant commodities and industrialization, along with the origins of campaigns or movements to ameliorate those impacts: for conservation, preservation, public health, and environmental justice--with special emphasis on the work of women and non-white activists to protect the most vulnerable people and wildlife from an increasingly toxic environment;
  • explain and evaluate the emergence of a stronger environmental consciousness beginning in the late twentieth century (with such developments as Earth Day, Ecofeminism, Wilderness and Wildlife Protection Acts and other state and federal environmental regulations);
  • demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to analyze historical trends (such as climate change) which hold implications for the future.

HIST 331 Women in American History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers a survey of U.S. women's history, including the origin and development of the nation's political, social, economic, and intellectual institutions, from pre-contact indigenous societies to the modern era. The diverse roles and contributions of European American, Native American, African American, Mexican American, and Asian American women are emphasized throughout the course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop skills in historical analysis, synthesis, and interpretation as well as a comprehension of literacy competency skills necessary to conduct basic research of historical documents, publications, and references.
  • compose historical writing assignments demonstrating written expression competency at the college composition level.
  • analyze and explain the contributions and significance of various groups of women to America’s political, economic and social systems, evaluating how women’s perspective and experience fits into the overall narrative of U.S. history.
  • analyze events or controversies in U.S. Women’s History from several historical perspectives including race, ethnicity, or social class.
  • define racism and sexism, and use these definitions to analyze the social, political, and economic status of women throughout U.S. history.

HIST 344 Survey of California History: A Multicultural Perspective

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement into ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2 (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of the history of California with an emphasis on the evolution of the state as a multicultural society, beginning with Native Californian cultures and continuing to the present. Above all, the course evaluates the historical experiences and dynamic interaction of Hispanic, Asian, African American, European American, and other cultural groups. Field trips to local sites of historical significance may be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct basic research of historical documents and publications, interpret primary and secondary sources, and utilize academic citations and formatting.
  • compose arguments, which evaluate evidence from historical sources and synthesize this evidence in support of a thesis statement and argumentative claims, reflecting writing competency at the college composition level.
  • assess the political, economic, social, and cultural evolution of California from the settlement of the first humans to the present, evaluating the historical origins and experiences of California’s multicultural society.
  • compare and contrast selected ethnic and cultural groups (including, but not limited to Native American, African-American, Latin-American, and Asian-American populations), evaluating intercultural contact (including intercultural families) and intercultural conflict with special emphasis placed on the importance of race, ethnicity and gender.
  • critically assess the role that ethnocentrism has played in California history, especially since the nineteenth century.

HIST 368 History of France

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area D (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2019)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

A survey of the history of France from Roman Gaul to the present, this course examines the origin and development of French political, economic, and intellectual institutions, their influence on French society and culture, and France’s role in Europe and the wider world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct basic research of historical documents and publications, interpret primary and secondary sources, and utilize academic citations and formatting.
  • demonstrate the ability to compose arguments, which evaluate evidence from historical sources and synthesize this evidence in support of a thesis statement and argumentative claims, reflecting writing competency at the college composition level.
  • demonstrate an understanding of French history incorporating perspectives of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • explain the major French economic, technological, and scientific developments and their historical significance.
  • demonstrate an understanding of France’s growth in a global context, and analyze the major political trends, attitudes, conflicts, and events—including both mainstream and reform efforts—and explain their historical significance.
  • explain the major French social and cultural developments, their causes and effects, and their historical significance.

HIST 392 Principles of Heritage Interpretation

  • Same As:ANTH 392 and BIOL 392
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This interdisciplinary course covers the basics of interpreting historical, cultural, and natural resources to the general public. Interpretation is a communication process that forges emotional and intellectual connections between the interests of the audience and the inherent meanings of the resource. Topics include developing an interpretive program using a thematic approach and learning program delivery techniques. Completion of this course will qualify students to apply for professional certification through the National Association for Interpretation as a Certified Interpretive Guide (CIG). This course is recommended for students interested in history, biology, anthropology, recreation, education, and communication. Not open to students who have received credit for Biology 392 or Anthropology 392. This course requires field trips.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define heritage interpretation.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the history, principles, and philosophy of interpretation as it is practiced in natural resource settings (parks and forests) and a variety of other settings (museums, nature centers, zoos, arboretums, planetariums, aquariums, botanical gardens, historic sites, etc.).
  • compose interpretive themes, goals, and objectives.
  • research, outline and develop an interpretive presentation.

HIST 398 Studying in France: French History and Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course, offered in a Paris study abroad program, surveys French history to provide a background for exploring and appreciating French life and culture. The focus is on examining the historical context of French political, intellectual, and artistic development, thereby informing and enriching our understanding and enjoyment of French society and culture. The course will examine Roman Gaul, Medieval Francia, the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Wars of Religion, Absolutism and the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and Napoleon, the Nineteenth Century Revolutions and the Belle Epoque, the World Wars, and the Trente Glorieuses. Since many of these historical developments occurred in the city of Paris and most of the remaining artifacts are housed in Parisian museums, a significant portion of this course will include visits to historical sites and museums.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose historical writing assignments reflecting written expression competency at the college composition level.
  • critically analyze the chronology of events that make up France’s past to understand change and/or continuity and cause and/or effect in history.
  • embody historical empathy by judging the past on its own terms and use that knowledge to understand contemporary issues.
  • demonstrate an understanding of French history through multiple analytical categories such as race, class, gender, and ethnicity.

HIST 495 Independent Studies in History

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

HIST 498 Work Experience in History

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of History. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.