Nutrition

Nutrition (NUTRI)

NUTRI 300 Nutrition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BIOL 300 and CHEM 305 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area E1
  • C-ID:C-ID NUTR 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines nutrition as a science and the chemical properties of nutrients in foods, the sources and functions of the nutrients in all stages of the life cycle, as well as nutrition as a world problem, and consumer problems related to food. Topics emphasized include nutrient metabolism, weight loss, sports nutrition, food safety, the diet-disease relationship, global nutrition and analysis of special nutritional requirements from the prenatal period through the geriatric years. An evaluation of personal dietary habits using current dietary guidelines and nutritional assessment methods will be completed to help students analyze their own nutritional health using scientific principles. Students will be required to complete a personalized dietary analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the interactions and relationships that exist between nutrients and the role of nutrients with a focus on metabolism.
  • assess the factors and possible problems associated with digestion and absorption of each of the nutrients.
  • distinguish the diseases associated with nutrient deficiency and toxicity, as well as chronic diseases associated with lifestyle choices, based on scientific principles used to analyze and evaluate nutrition information.
  • compare and contrast nutrient, caloric, and food requirements at all stages of the life cycle.
  • assess personal dietary intake and evaluate food choices.
  • correlate dietary intake to weight management, sports performance, chronic diseases, and hunger.

NUTRI 302 Nutrition for Physical Performance

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:NUTRI 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the basic scientific principles of nutrition, as well as the ramifications of nutrients on lifelong fitness, sport skill training, and physical performance. Special emphasis is placed on nutrient metabolism with respect to muscle strength development, cardiovascular capability, and body composition. Students are required to complete a personalized dietary analysis as specified by the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the role of nutrients and proper water regulation on the body, especially during physical activity.
  • critique diets for nutrient intake that meet varying physical performance levels and for weight control.
  • evaluate the effectiveness and safety concerns of various nutritional supplements.
  • identify characteristics of eating disorders and understand where to refer individuals and families for appropriate nutrition counseling and information.
  • describe nutritional needs of special populations (i.e. pregnant women, older adults, diabetics, young children) with respect to physical activity.

NUTRI 310 Cultural Foods of the World

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110, ENGWR 101, ESLL 310, ESLR 310, and ESLW 310, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers an anthropological perspective of traditional and contemporary food customs and cultures. Western and non-western food customs are compared, including their social, religious, economic and aesthetic significance. Included are ethnocentrism, gender-related stereotypes, and racism as they relate to the availability, distribution and preparation of food throughout the world. The nutritional status of various cultures as it relates to geographic, agricultural and socioeconomic factors is studied. Students may be required to purchase ethnic food or ingredients to prepare and sample cultural dishes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of food patterns for each region of the world.
  • describe ethnicity, ethnocentrism, and racism and analyze the impact of these on food habits and communication in the United States.
  • evaluate common foods and traditions for each region as to their relationship to health and disease.
  • identify food patterns as related to migration, religious practices, cultural customs, and health beliefs.
  • assess the role of migration and foods from around the world on regional food patterns in the United States.

NUTRI 320 Children's Health, Safety and Nutrition

  • Same As:ECE 415
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ECE 312 or NUTRI 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 220
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an introduction to the laws, regulations, standards, policies and procedures and early childhood curriculum related to child health safety and nutrition. The key components that ensure physical health, mental health and safety for both children and staff will be identified along with the importance of collaboration with families and health professionals. There is a focus on integrating the concepts into everyday planning and program development for all children. This course is not open to students who have received credit for ECE 415.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess strategies to maximize the mental and physical health of children and adults in programs for all young children in accordance with culturally, linguistic and developmentally sound practice.
  • identify health, safety and environmental risks in children’s programs.
  • analyze the nutritional needs of children at various ages and evaluate the relationship between healthy development and healthy nutrition.
  • evaluate laws, regulations, standards, policies and procedures related to health and safety and nutrition in support of young children, teachers and families.
  • distinguish aspects of quality in programs for young children as related to health and safety, acknowledging the value of collaboration with families and the community.
  • investigate current health, safety, and nutrition issues and demonstrate how the issues relate to policy development.
  • research, identify and locate community resources which promote the health, safety, and nutrition of children and families.
  • evaluate the nutritional status and feeding practices during fetal development, infancy and childhood and plan and analyze menus for children which meet current state and federal guidelines.
  • examine variations of nutritional and health and safety practices and perspectives in culturally diverse communities.
  • develop activities that teach children positive health, safety and nutrition habits.
  • evaluate mechanisms for protecting children’s well-being and keeping children safe including, but not limited to: emergency preparedness and disaster plans, child abuse prevention and reporting policies, illness and injury prevention and reporting policies, the identification of safe feeding practices to prevent food-borne illness, the identification and reporting polices of common childhood illnesses/infectious or communicable diseases and potential hazards in children's environments.

NUTRI 322 Nutrition Issues Throughout Life

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:NUTRI 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the nutritive needs of persons at various stages of the lifecycle with emphasis on special periods such as pregnancy, preschool, adolescence, and aging. This course is particularly helpful to Kinesiology and Early Childhood Education majors as well as those dealing with people in social agencies, such as nursing and gerontology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate independent learning and effective communication skills.
  • show an understanding of the basic principles of nutrition.
  • appraise nutrient needs and design ways to meet those needs under normal conditions at each stage of life.
  • evaluate the adequacy of various diets by using computerized diet analysis software.
  • build a basic healthy eating plan for a person at any stage in the life cycle.

NUTRI 330 Food Theory and Preparation

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51 and MATH 20 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID NUTR 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of the basic principles of cooking techniques and the use of ingredients in various foods. Students will assess the factors that influence taste and the changes that occur in foods during preparation. In the laboratory, the focus will be directed at students gaining hands-on experience in basic cooking skills, the application of food theories discussed in the lecture, the reasons for recipe procedures and the prevention and correction of cooking failures. Students will be required to purchase a calculator, lab coat, and closed toe shoes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize quality characteristics in raw and cooked foods, to include sensory evaluation of texture, taste, and color.
  • measure and scale food ingredients, recognize kitchen equipment by name and use them appropriately.
  • apply principles of food theory to choose and demonstrate optimal cooking procedures to maximize nutrient content for all categories of food. Categories include, but are not limited to: vegetables, fruits, fats and oils, milk products, eggs, cereals, baked products, starches, poultry, meat, and seafood.
  • distinguish between different methods of heat transfer and choose cooking materials and techniques accordingly.
  • correct errors in preparation, analyze quality defects in cooked products, and specify possible errors in techniques or ingredient selection.
  • apply best practices in food preparation hygiene techniques in the laboratory.

NUTRI 340 Nutrition and Metabolism

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:BIOL 300, CHEM 305, or NUTRI 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the chemical structure and metabolism of carbohydrate, lipids, and proteins. Emphasis is placed on the physiological roles of vitamins and minerals as well as metabolic pathways and their relation to overall health. In addition, this course will help the student integrate the understanding of metabolic knowledge to contemporary and controversial issues in nutrition.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the scientific method and how scientists use various types of research studies and methods to acquire nutrition information.
  • define the four categories of the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI), explain their purposes, and the supporting basic scientific research methods that used to create them.
  • identify several health and lifestyle risk factors and explain their relationships to nutrition and chronic diseases.
  • analyze and examine the chemical structure and metabolism of nutrients at the physiological level.
  • explain how medical and biochemical assessment methods are used to detect energy and nutrient deficiencies and excesses.
  • generate and interpret oral and written communication to critically evaluate scientific nutrition information presented in popular media publications.

NUTRI 495 Independent Studies in Nutrition and Foods

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

NUTRI 498 Work Experience in Nutrition

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of Nutrition. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.