Psychology

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 10 Support for Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:PSYC 330
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides intensive instruction and practice in the core skills, competencies, and concepts necessary for success in PSYC 330, Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. You must be enrolled in the corresponding section of PSYC 330 while taking this course. Topics and homework assignments are connected to the assignments in PSYC 330. Students will be expected to use technology for data analysis including a scientific calculator and SPSS. This class is graded on a pass/no pass basis and does not meet math competency.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply appropriate learning strategies and study habits to improve understanding and performance of the material in PSYC 330.
  • demonstrate relevant arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric skills in the context of statistics.
  • use problem solving techniques in the context of data analysis and statistical methods.

PSYC 300 General Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. The content focuses on the exploration of major psychological theories and concepts, methods, and research findings in psychology. Topics include the biological bases of behavior, perception, cognition and consciousness, learning, memory, emotion, motivation, development, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders and therapeutic approaches, and applied psychology. This course is designed for psychology majors, behavioral and social science majors, and other students who desire a broad overview of the field.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the major theoretical perspectives in psychology.
  • evaluate the influence of biological and environmental factors on behavior and mental processes.
  • analyze personal and societal problems in light of psychological concepts, theories, and research findings.

PSYC 312 Biological Psychology

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will focus on how the brain produces thought and behavior. It will explore the physiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary mechanisms underlying fundamental human capacities such as sensory perception, movement, sleep, dreaming, emotion, motivation, memory and language. Students will explore the broader ethical and societal implications of recent advances in neuroscience, as well as the variety of research methods used to achieve these advances. Students will dissect brains and other nervous tissue and record psychophysiological signals to provide a deeper understanding of nervous system anatomy and physiology. This is a basic course for psychology, biological science and allied health majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify key brain structures involved in central elements of cognition and behavior such as sensory perception, movement, regulation of sleep, emotions, motivation, memory and language.
  • relate behavior and mental processes to physiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary mechanisms.
  • analyze changes in human cognition and behavior in terms of the development, plasticity, and pathology of the nervous system.
  • understand the strengths and limitations of neuroscience research methods and evaluate the broader implications of recent research advances.

PSYC 320 Social Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the scientific study of human interaction, with an emphasis on the individual within a social context. Study includes: social perception, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, the self and social identity, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, social influence, prosocial behavior, aggression, and group behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain key concepts, theories, and research findings in social psychology.
  • compare and contrast concepts and theories across social psychology.
  • apply social psychological research and theories to explain social issues.
  • explain how key social psychological concepts were developed from a scientific approach.
  • identify social, biological, and cultural influences on behavior.

PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 with a grade of "C" or better and MATH 120 (Intermediate Algebra) or 125 (Intermediate Algebra with Applications) with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (PSYC 330 and STAT 300 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area B4; IGETC Area 2
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 125
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses upon the concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential statistics in psychology and other behavioral sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics; probability and sampling distributions; parametric and nonparametric statistical methods, hypothesis testing, statistical inference and power; correlation and regression; chi-square; t-tests; and analysis of variance procedures. Application of both hand-computation and statistical software to data in a social science context will be emphasized to include the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the standard methods of obtaining data and describe the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • interpret data displayed in tables and graphs.
  • calculate and interpret the following: measures of central tendency and variability (mean, median, mode, range, variance, standard deviation), measures of relative standing, probability (for both normal and t-distributions), sample space, one-sample z-test, one-sample t-test, independent samples t-test, correlated groups t-test, analysis of variance, correlation, regression, chi-square test of independence, and chi-square goodness of fit, confidence intervals, p-values.
  • describe the role the following concepts play in hypothesis testing: sample versus population distributions, Central Limit Theorem, null and alternative hypotheses, statistical significance, Type I and Type II errors, power, alpha, directional versus non-directional tests.
  • identify when to use the following tests and formulate the correct null and alternative hypothesis for each test: one-sample z-test, one-sample t-test, independent groups t-test, correlated groups t-test, one-way between subjects ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, simple linear regression, chi-square test of independence, and chi-square goodness of fit.
  • use SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) to analyze data from social science, psychology, health science, and education and interpret the output.

PSYC 335 Research Methods in Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 and 330 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the basic principles and methods of conducting psychological research. The course is designed to expose students to the different experimental and non-experimental research methods used by psychologists to study human behavior and thought processes. In this course, students will engage in each step of the research process including developing a hypothesis, conducting a literature review, designing a study, collecting data, analyzing data, and writing up and presenting the results.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the different research methods used by psychologists.
  • evaluate the appropriateness of conclusions derived from psychological research and the generalizability of research findings.
  • describe the ethical treatment of participants.
  • design and conduct basic studies to address psychological questions using appropriate research methods.
  • demonstrate proficiency in APA style.

PSYC 340 Abnormal Behavior

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b) (effective Summer 2020); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an exploration of the broad questions of normality and abnormality. It includes an investigation of specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties as viewed from the biological, psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and socio-cultural perspectives. Current approaches to psychological assessment and treatment modalities will be covered, including current community mental health practices. Students will learn research methodology in psychopathology including descriptive, epidemiological, experimental, and single-subject approaches.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, describe, and discuss various aspects of normal and abnormal behavior, including specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties.
  • demonstrate an understanding of clinical ethics and psychological research including research methodology in psychopathology including descriptive, epidemiological, experimental and single-subject approach research designs.
  • analyze, evaluate and categorize the impact of specific stereotypes and prejudices that surround people experiencing severe problems in adaptive behavior.
  • identify, review and critique the current approaches to psychological intervention including current community mental health practices.
  • evaluate and understand the contribution of biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors that contribute to the development and persistence of psychological disorders.

PSYC 356 Human Sexuality

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers a balanced scientific understanding of the biopsychosocial perspective on human sexual behavior from birth through adulthood. The course provides factual, up-to-date nonjudgmental information designed to dispel myths, facilitate problem identification and possible solutions. The course explores the impact of cultural influences on human sexual behaviors of different ethnic groups. A survey of the historical, biological, psychological and sociocultural perspectives and aspects of the diversity of human sexual behavior is compared and contrasted. Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology, conception and childbirth, contraception, sexual development, variations and deviations, sex research, sexually transmitted diseases, sex therapy, intimacy and relationships, and sexual victimization.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the scientific method as it relates to key research findings pertaining to the diversity of human sexual behaviors.
  • compare and contrast biological, psychological and cultural similarities and diversity in human sexual behavior.
  • examine, analyze, and compare the diverse experiences that influence human sexual behaviors with particular emphasis on historical and cultural practices of human sexual behaviors.
  • examine, analyze, and contrast the factors that influence diverse human sexual behaviors including causes and the evaluation of possible solutions to multiple ethnocentric problems.

PSYC 360 Psychology of Women

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the human development process as it relates to women with an emphasis on the understanding of the specific female experiences in adolescence, adulthood and old age. Course topics include an examination of relevant research methods, theoretical perspectives, gender comparisons, gender stereotypes, the specific experiences of women of color, women across the lifespan, female sexuality, reproductive processes, physical and mental health, achievement of women,work by women and violence toward women. A major component of this course emphasizes a comprehensive understanding of the specific experiences women have in our society and throughout the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the major theoretical perspectives as they pertain to the psychology of women.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the human development process as it relates to women with an emphasis on the understanding of the specific female experiences in adolescence, adulthood and old age.
  • evaluate and demonstrate an understanding of the individual, social and cross-cultural factors that impact the female experiences, feelings, thoughts and behaviors in all aspects of life as children, mothers, partners, workers, etc.
  • identify and explain the processes and outcomes involved in female sexual and reproductive behavior and the development of sexual orientation and sexual identity along with factors related to exploitation and victimization of women.

PSYC 368 Cross Cultural Psychology

  • Same As:SWHS 331
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:PSYC 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the impact of cultural influences on the psychological and individual development of ethnic group members. Emphasis will be placed on integrating traditional theoretical approaches and current cross-cultural statistical research and theory in the study of African-Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, gays & lesbians, the elderly, and the disabled. This course is not open to those who have completed SWHS 331.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define culture; ethnic group demographics; family and gender roles; collectivism and individualism; research methodologies; identity formation and ethnicity, stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination; cognition and intelligence; language, bilingualism and non-verbal communication; psychosocial stressors; and behavior disorders.
  • recognize, understand and analyze psychological issues related to individual and institutionalized ethnocentrism, stereotyping, and prejudice, including recognizing one's own ethnocentrism, stereotypes and prejudice.
  • demonstrate an understanding of, describe, and critically analyze the research on the impact of culture and minority status on basic psychological processes.
  • compare and contrast research biases in the study of individuals from diverse populations.

PSYC 370 Human Development: A Life Span

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ECE 312, FCS 324, PSYC 370 and PSYC 372: maximum credit, two courses )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview, from a developmental and psychological perspective, of human development from conception through death, including biological and environmental influences. Theories and research of physical, cognitive, personality, and social development are examined, as well as attention to developmental problems. This course is designed to fulfill General Education, Nursing and Psychology degree requirements. This course is not open to those who have previously completed FCS 324.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • contrast and compare developmental theories and approaches (including how different theoretical perspectives affect or determine the research and applications that arise from them).
  • analyze elements of a scientific approach to understanding human development in a biopsychosocial context.
  • identify biological, psychological, and sociocultural influences on lifespan development.
  • describe the ways in which psychological principles and research apply to real world problems and issues across the lifespan
  • describe the sequences of physical, social, and cognitive development across the lifespan, using the constructs and conceptual framework provided by psychological perspectives.
  • identify and describe the techniques and methods used by development psychologists to study human development.
  • identify and describe classic and contemporary theories and research in lifespan psychology.
  • describe the developing person at different periods of the lifespan.
  • identify possible causes or sources of developmental change and reasons for disturbances in the developmental process.

PSYC 372 Child Development

  • Same As:ECE 312
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or 103; or ESLL 310, ESLR 320, and ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ECE 312, FCS 324, PSYC 370 and PSYC 372: maximum credit, two courses )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will examine the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of the child from the prenatal period through adolescence. Scientific findings and theoretical insights from a range of disciplines will inform an integrated examination of development during the childhood years. This course is designed to fulfill general education, Psychology degree, and Early Childhood Education requirements. This course is not open to those who have previously taken ECE 312.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze developmental stages and growth processes across the domains of development, from the prenatal period through adolescence.
  • evaluate individual growth processes and the influence of genes and the environment on the growth and development of children.
  • compare and contrast different theoretical perspectives used in the study of child development.
  • integrate developmental theories to real life situations with children.
  • compare and contrast individual differences among children.
  • differentiate typical and atypical behavior of children.
  • analyze the influence of the cultural and familial contexts on the developing child.
  • identify and demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in the study of child development.

PSYC 495 Independent Studies in Psychology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019