Business

Business (BUS)

BUS 100 English for the Professional

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51, or ESLR 310 and ESLW 310, with a grade of "C" or better; or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to prepare the student for business communication. It presents principles of correct and effective English usage as applied in business. The course focuses on skills and techniques of effective business written communication including appropriate sentence structure, word usage, punctuation, spelling, business vocabulary, and business document formatting. Critical thinking and effective writing techniques are emphasized. This course focuses on teaching students the ability to analyze, compose, and organize written communication into effective business documents. Proofreading skills are stressed throughout the course. This course is required of all business technology majors and recommended for all business majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, select, and use appropriate writing aids, references, and Internet resources used in business writing.
  • demonstrate the ability to prepare business documents that exhibit a clear understanding of the structure of English grammar, word usage, punctuation, spelling, and business vocabulary.
  • analyze and evaluate business documents in order to determine the appropriate format, tone, word usage, punctuation, and purpose.
  • compose business documents that demonstrate the essentials of sentence structure, critical thinking, and effective writing techniques.
  • revise and edit business documents.

BUS 295 Independent Studies in Business

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

BUS 300 Introduction to Business

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID BUS 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a survey of various business areas, including accounting, regulation, negotiation, ethics, information technology, management, marketing, global competition, economics, finance, environmental factors, implementation, communications, leadership, and business planning. The course is designed to be taken by all beginning students interested in business. It is a core requirement for business majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the economic, social, legal, and governmental environments in which business organizations operate.
  • describe the major functional areas of business organizations including planning, management, marketing, and finance.
  • apply course concepts to the business applications.
  • critically analyze practical business problems and utilize critical thinking in the determination of alternative solutions.

BUS 302 Introduction to Business Analysis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Business analysis includes the practical skills to increase organizational efficiency and effectiveness through business process improvement. This course teaches the essential business skills needed to implement activities and processes that solve basic business problems through the analysis of business data and information. Students will learn the basics of problem solving, analysis of data and information, and basic business mathematic equations, in order to improve business operations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the fundamental business analysis concepts.
  • demonstrate knowledge of business analysis tasks and processes.
  • define the role of a business analyst in terms of identifying and comprehending stakeholders' needs.
  • identify the key business analyst responsibilities in each of the knowledge areas.

BUS 310 Business Communications

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:BUS 100 or ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Advisory:Ability to key 30 or more words a minute and use a current office-level word processing program.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course applies the theory and principles of ethical and effective written and oral communication to the creation of letters, memos, emails, and written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. The course emphasizes planning, organizing, composing, and revising business documents and creating and delivering professional-level oral reports using word processing software and presentation software. Analytical skills are used to plan, organize, compose, critique, and revise letters, memos, emails, and reports. Messages are broken into their component parts for a critical analysis of organization, content, style, tone, grammar, format, and appearance. Students conduct primary and secondary research to draw conclusions and make recommendations. A formal analytical research paper using APA or MLA style citations and graphics is required. The results of the formal research paper are presented in an oral presentation using presentation software.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the theory and process of effective communication including the elements of the communication process.
  • demonstrate an understanding of ethics and social etiquette and sensitivity to audience needs including cross-cultural situations that are applicable in a business environment.
  • analyze the elements necessary to plan, organize, write, review, revise and re-write written business documents.
  • solve business communication problems through planning, problem solving, organizing, writing, listening and presentation techniques.
  • analyze communication in an internationalization and globalization context.
  • utilize research and incorporate sources effectively and meaningfully in a formal business report (including graphics).

BUS 320 Concepts in Personal Finance

  • Same As:ECON 320
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to assist individuals in analyzing their financial affairs. Elements and conceptual basis of financial planning, analysis, and decision making in areas of budgeting, taxes, borrowing, money management, insurance, investments, and retirement will be examined with an emphasis on principles to develop students' economic decision making. Students will be using mathematical concepts as well as reading and interpreting written and oral instructions. This course is not open to students who have received credit for ECON 320.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate economic needs and goals and design financial models to achieve them.
  • analyze the changing economic environment.
  • apply economic principles and concepts of individual economic planning.
  • analyze the conceptual basis of various economic tools available to the individual as well as the terminology used in their development and implementation.

BUS 330 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2019)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the leadership skills and abilities needed to manage a multicultural workforce. A primary focus is placed upon the workplace impact of various historical, social, and cultural experiences/perspectives related to gender, age, ethnicity, and disability. Workforce issues related to the diversity of the American consumer's and global consumer's impact on the United States are analyzed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define cultural diversity within the context of the global workplace.
  • analyze how language, gender, race, ethnicity, and organizational culture interact to produce an organizational climate.
  • demonstrate leadership, negotiation and communication skills that are effective in managing a multicultural workforce.

BUS 340 Business Law

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (BUS 340 and 341: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID BUS 125
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to law as it relates to business. The course covers the American legal system as an instrument of economic, social, and political control. It stresses basic business torts, crime and business, agency, employment, and the legal structures of business. Students may be required to subscribe to the weekly (M-F) edition of a general circulation newspaper.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the historical development of the law and operation of the court system; the sources of commercial law; the social, political and ethical implications of the law and their application to actual and hypothetical business transactions.
  • compare and contrast different legal systems as they apply to business law including the different jurisdictions such as local, state and federal systems and highlight/reinforce the difference between and purpose of criminal and tort law.
  • evaluate when a promise is enforceable, the elements of a contract, performance, the remedies available in the event of breach and the Uniform Commercial Code specific contract requirements.
  • demonstrate the ability to utilize the internet to research legal issues and perform legal research, including the ability to utilize the computer to enhance effective business communications, develop presentations, use appropriate business and legal terminology, the ability to analyze whether a source is a reliable source for legal information, and perform legal research to evaluate and interpret a court citation and locate a court case on an assigned topic.
  • interpret regulatory laws, legislation and statutes and discuss how they promote corporate responsibility and ethical decision making, including the ability to appraise the relationship between law and ethics.
  • categorize the types of government agencies, powers and functions, controls through congressional action, executive action, and the courts.
  • demonstrate how cases progress through the court system from problem, to filing, to trial, and appeal.
  • explain a corporation’s legal structure and differentiate it from other forms of business organization, the meaning of limited liability for the owners; describe the relationship of the various stakeholders.

BUS 345 Law and Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID LPPS 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the American legal system emphasizing the nature, purpose, sources, and functions of American law but including some comparative analysis of other historical and contemporary legal systems. It stresses the evolution of legal concepts as a reflection of the social environment and the role of the judiciary in establishing social policy. Students may be required to subscribe to a daily newspaper and to bring the paper to class.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify issues and apply the appropriate legal rules to the fact patterns to research defensible legal actions (IRAC - Issue, Rule, Application and Conclusion).
  • perform legal research, to include evaluating and interpreting a court citation and locating a court case on an assigned topic.
  • compare and contrast the theories of jurisprudence and classifications of law.
  • categorize the types of government agencies, powers and functions, controls through congressional action, executive action, and the courts.
  • differentiate between federal and systems, jurisdiction of courts, the interaction between business managers and lawyers, and the importance of alternate dispute resolution methods.
  • demonstrate how cases progress through the court system from problem, to filing, to trial, and appeal.
  • describe the constitutional basis for federal government regulation of business, including limits of government power.
  • appraise the relationship between law and ethics.
  • describe the various agency relationships and the duties and liabilities of agents and principals as the foundation of partnerships and corporations.
  • distinguish between torts and crimes and describe the purpose of criminal and tort law.
  • evaluate when a promise is enforceable, the elements of a contract, performance, and remedies available in the event of a breach.
  • distinguish between contracts governed by the Uniform Commercial Code and those governed by the common law of contracts.
  • explain a corporation's legal structure and differentiate it from other forms of business organization, the meaning of limited liability for the owners; describe the relationship of the various stakeholders.
  • describe the Constitutional basis for federal governmental regulation of business, including limits of government power.
  • describe the major federal acts that pertain to antitrust, securities regulation, employment law, and environmental law.
  • compare and contrast state and federal regulation.
  • differentiate between the application of domestic and international legal principles.
  • integrate the role of logic, critical analysis, imagination, and creativity in the the study and application of the law and the legal process.
  • distinguish between torts and crimes and describe the purpose of criminal and tort law demonstrate an understanding of contracts, classification, contract terms and elements, performance, enforcement, breach, and remedies. analyze cases and identify issues and apply the appropriate legal rules to the fact patterns to reach defensible legal conclusions.
  • analyze how individual rights in our common law legal system interact with the rights of other individuals, businesses, and the government.

BUS 350 Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class provides an overview of the various elements involved in starting and operating a small business. It introduces such topics as developing a business plan, finding financial resources, developing personal and business goals, meeting legal requirements, understanding marketing concepts, and other topics of interest to the entrepreneur.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the form of business organization to be used based on analysis of small business structure and liability issues.
  • explain the importance of a business plan, a financial plan, and a marketing plan.
  • apply principles of management and marketing relevant to the small business.
  • evaluate various financial reports.
  • analyze the impact of various legal requirements and government regulations as related to the operation of a small business.

BUS 355 Introduction to Global Entrepreneurship

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an introduction to the various elements involved in the development of new global small businesses and the expansion of existing business to a global level. The course introduces topics including: successful traits of a global entrepreneur, the entrepreneur's role in the global economy, the basics of exporting, economic considerations in global business, sources of international marketing data, and international business relations across cultures. Emphasis will be placed on the principle concepts of global entrepreneurship.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the opportunities for new global business and business global expansion.
  • apply the principles of foreign business establishment and management relevant to the global entrepreneur.
  • evaluate the various sources of data necessary to start and operate an international business.
  • assess export progress and success.
  • construct a business plan adjusted to the global marketplace.

BUS 356 Global Business Operations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class provides an overview of the necessary training to manage global business operations. The course will focus on strategies to effectively operate within differing cultures, following an efficient distribution plan, developing and achieving business goals, political and technological issues on a global scale, and other topics of interest to future participants in the global marketplace. Emphasis will be placed on operations which must be in place to foster global trade and exporting including logistics, trade regulations, economic considerations, and marketing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the critical components of logistics and distribution, supply chain management, and cultural differences in managing a global business.
  • audit the global business operations plan.
  • demonstrate an understanding of basic global business operations concepts.

BUS 357 Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and New Enterprise Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the processes used by entrepreneurs to develop new innovative products and services. The course will provide an introduction to the tools, processes, and insights that are used to create, new innovative products for both domestic and foreign markets. Course topics include new business concept development, the role of entrepreneurship, innovation and technology in new venture development, the importance of intellectual property rights and protection, sources of capital and financing, market analysis and strategy, and business planning.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • utilize new technology and the principles of design thinking to create new small business ventures.
  • demonstrate the basic skills needed to be a successful entrepreneur.
  • identify and source the necessary financial and non-financial resources available for a new venture.
  • demonstrate the importance of innovation in the creation of a sustainable competitive advantage for business.
  • describe the role of the makerspace to support a network for new ventures.
  • describe a new business in a well-written venture plan.

BUS 490 Individualized Projects in Business

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 36 hours LEC; 27 - 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:At least two semesters of successful work leading to an Associate Degree or Certificate in Accounting, Business, Computer Information Science, Finance, Management, Marketing, Office Administration or other related field.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to help the student focus skills previously learned in an area of business. The student, with the help of the instructor, will produce a project that utilizes a variety of skills. The student will describe a problem, plan a process to arrive at a solution, work with the instructor to secure those resources necessary to complete the project, submit progress reports on a regular basis, and present a finished product. This class may be required for some degrees or certificates.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe and narrow the focus on a problem.
  • provide the framework of a solution.
  • delineate a plan for implementing a solution including specific steps, which will culminate in a finished project.
  • review a plan with an instructor at is inception and at each step along the way making modifications as is necessary.
  • implement a plan.
  • present a finished project.
  • jointly evaluate his/her own project and those of others in the class along with the instructor in light of the previously described problem and plan.

BUS 495 Independent Studies in Business

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:27 - 216 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

BUS 498 Work Experience in Business

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must be in a paid or non-paid internship, volunteer opportunity, or job related to career interests.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of Business. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completing required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the semester, the student is required to attend orientation. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken for a maximum of 16 units. Students should have access to a computer, the Internet, and some computer media such as a USB drive to store data files. Online students must have an email account. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in a field of study or career as written in the minimum 3 learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • manage personal career plans and decision making using industry & workforce information and online resources.
  • behave professionally and ethically, exhibit adaptability, initiative, self-awareness and self-management as needed.
  • exhibit effective communication, collaboration, and leadership skills at work with consideration to workplace dynamics and social and diversity awareness.
  • demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills as they apply to the workplace.