English

English - Creative Writing (ENGCW)

ENGCW 400 Creative Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ENGCW 400, 410, 420 and 430 combined: maximum credit, two courses )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area C2
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This introductory creative writing course offers writing experience in three or four of the following genres: short story, poetry, creative nonfiction, and script writing. The course includes analysis of literary models, faculty and class critiques of work, and discussion of literary techniques in each of the covered genres.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the major literary elements in each of the genres specified by the instructor.
  • recognize and discuss genre-specific literary elements and craft in the texts of professional writers.
  • critique constructively the use of genre-specific literary elements in the texts of their classmates, and understand the creative writing workshop model and its benefits in the writer's own work.
  • compose at least one manuscript, integrating the appropriate literary elements, in each of the genres specified by the instructor.
  • demonstrate awareness of craft and technique (tone, style, purpose, voice, point of view).

ENGCW 410 Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ENGCW 400, 410, 420 and 430 combined: maximum credit, two courses )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area C2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is focused on the craft of fiction writing, with an emphasis on short fiction. Students write short fictional pieces, receive feedback from their peers and the instructor, and analyze fiction written by professional writers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the elements that comprise fictional narrative.
  • recognize fictional elements, craft, and technique, and appraise their effectiveness in the texts of professional writers.
  • critique constructively the use of language, craft, and technique in the work of classmates.
  • exhibit control over language quality and the use of image, metaphor, voice, purpose, point of view, plot, story, structure, form, style, and voice in his or her own creative narratives.

ENGCW 420 Poetry Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ENGCW 400, 410, 420 and 430 combined: maximum credit, two courses )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the craft of poetry writing. Students write a number of poems in a variety of forms, receive feedback on their poetry from their peers and the instructor, and analyze poetry written by professional writers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify poetic elements.
  • recognize the poetic elements and appraise their effectiveness in the texts of professional writers.
  • critique constructively the use of poetic elements in the texts of their classmates.
  • integrate the use of poetic elements into their own poems.

ENGCW 430 Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ENGCW 400, 410, 420 and 430 combined: maximum credit, two courses )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a creative writing course concentrating on the literary essay. Students will write and critically examine various kinds of creative nonfiction such as memoir, autobiography, prose with poetic elements (prose-poetry), and fact-based or philosophical writing with a definite literary, stylistic component. It also focuses on constructive in-class analysis of personal essays written by students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose creative nonfiction manuscripts, integrating appropriate literary elements.
  • recognize, evaluate, and analyze the major literary elements of both student and professional creative nonfiction writing.

ENGCW 452 College Literary Magazine

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides instruction and editorial staff experience in producing a literary and fine arts magazine. Editorial staff collaborate with multiple departments to prepare FLC's college magazine, The Machine, for national competitions sponsored by organizations such as the Columbia Scholastic Press Association and the Associated Collegiate Press. The course focuses on the selection and editing of literary content, and on the publicity, marketing, fundraising, and distribution of a magazine. This course may be taken four times for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose publicity that achieves goals for a literary publication, including calls for submissions and magazine sales.
  • apply critical thinking skills: identifying and defining problems or issues related to editing and production; collectively analyzing and evaluating literary pieces and other information related to production; synthesizing and developing conclusions.
  • gain introductory knowledge of current software necessary for editorial production, including word processing, database, and e-mail applications.
  • recommend revisions to authors seeking publication in the magazine and awards in contests.
  • collaborate effectively with editorial and design teams to compete in national magazine contests.
  • prepare literary manuscripts for national competitions.
  • create and develop competitive literary standards for The Machine literary magazine.

ENGCW 495 Independent Studies in English - Creative Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

English - Education (ENGED)

ENGED 305 Structure of English

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Designed for prospective teachers or those entering professions requiring strong written language skills, this course is a study of the structure of English grammar systems, especially as they relate to writing. Students will write 2-3 short essays (totaling 2000 words) in which they discuss various aspects of grammar instruction. The class includes the study and practice of traditional and modern grammars, with emphasis on the relationship of grammar to sentence structure. Students will have the opportunity to study the history of the English language, instructional methodologies, and selected issues of language acquisition among the culturally diverse population in California schools. This class meets the CSU, Sacramento, requirement for Liberal Studies majors and is on the list of recommended courses for English majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and explain the parts of speech, grammatical structures, and sentence types used in traditional English grammar.
  • distinguish between standard and nonstandard usage as applied to writing.
  • analyze and correct common writing errors in English grammar, punctuation, usage and conventions.
  • assess the implications of English grammatical features for English language learners.
  • compare and contrast methods of language acquisition, including acquisition of English among culturally diverse populations.
  • employ critical thinking skills in making appropriate rhetorical choices based on grammatical considerations.
  • apply techniques such as sentence combining to express relationships between grammar and writing.
  • explain the irregularities in English grammar by drawing upon the history of the English language and upon a basic knowledge of morphemes.

ENGED 320 Service Learning: Tutoring Elementary Students in Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students are required to show proof of TB clearance and complete a fingerprint clearance through the cooperating school district before they can attend the school site for field work.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class offers students an opportunity to learn and practice basic methods of tutoring elementary children in reading. After the first 2-3 weeks of training, students will be assigned to a nearby public elementary school to tutor during school hours, or they may be placed in a before or after school program. At the tutoring site, they will have in-depth practice tutoring elementary children who are reading below grade level. The students will tutor a total of 54 hours. Students will continue to attend the lecture portion of the class throughout the semester in order to receive additional training. This course is one of the two required field experience courses for the CSUS Liberal Studies major, also known as the Teacher Preparation Program. Prior to beginning work in the schools, students may be required to be fingerprinted and must pass a TB test.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the reading process, including integration of a reader's visual and auditory processing, the role of individual learning styles, and the impact of social environment on reading.
  • informally assess a child's reading ability, including assessment of phonics, comprehension, and fluency skills.
  • use time management skills and create lesson plans that apply multiple tutoring techniques in varied tutoring situations to instruct children in reading skills such as word analysis, sight word recognition, fluency, and comprehension.
  • analyze areas of reading weakness and implement strategies to address the identified areas.
  • apply principles of motivation to the reluctant or unskilled reader.
  • provide educationally relevant community and college involvement in local reading programs.

ENGED 495 Independent Studies in English - Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

English - Laboratory (ENGLB)

ENGLB 71 Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum

  • Units:0.5 - 3
  • Hours:27 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students receive individualized assistance with their reading and writing assignments across the disciplines. Students may enter the course at any time during the first 8 weeks of the semester and earn either 0.5 or 1 unit per semester. ENGLB 71 may be taken for up to 3 units total, at a rate of .5 or 1.0 unit per semester, until the 3 unit limit is reached. This course is graded pass/no pass.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify key terms and concepts that s/he must address in the assigned reading and writing.
  • evaluate their reading projects in terms of vocabulary, implied and stated main ideas, supporting details, patterns of organization, purpose, tone, and argument.
  • evaluate their writing projects in terms of main ideas, development, organization, sentence structure, grammar, and diction.

English - Literature (ENGLT)

ENGLT 303 Introduction to the Short Story

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the short story genre, and involves a close study of this genre's role in literary history. Students will read, analyze, and discuss short stories by predominantly American and British authors, but include authors from other countries who have been significant to this genre. Thematic emphasis will focus on the connections between literature, culture, and human experience.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate short stories using the elements of fiction.
  • compare and contrast the use of themes and fictional elements in various works.
  • defend interpretations of stories with relevant textual support.

ENGLT 305 Introduction to the Novel

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2 (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2019)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the novel and its genre conventions beginning with its formative years and the writings of Samuel Richardson and Daniel Defoe to the present.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the novel according to its genre conventions and the elements of fiction.
  • compare and contrast the use of themes and other fictional elements in various works.
  • construct interpretations and readings of texts and provide evidence for these readings with relevant textual support.

ENGLT 310 English Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves a close study of significant works of major British authors from the Beowulf poet through Samuel Johnson, with consideration of the important aspects of British literary history. In this course, students will read and analyze numerous literary works relevant to literature as a whole and to British culture in particular, making connections between various literary periods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and summarize the major eras of development of literature from the beginning of the Anglo-Saxon Period through the 18th century Neo-Classical Period.
  • differentiate the times and concerns of the writers covered, tracing threads of thought, contrasting views and approaches, and synthesizing various ideas.
  • criticize and analyze literature of these periods, defining key ideas and explaining cause/effect relationships associated with the literary movements using relevant literary terms.
  • compose focused, analytical essays showing insight into the themes expressed in the literature of these historical periods.
  • compare and contrast various works of literature and themes through discussion and in writing.

ENGLT 311 English Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 165
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course surveys significant works of British authors from the beginning of Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century to the Moderns and Post-Moderns of the Twentieth Century, with consideration of the important aspects of English literary history. In this course, students will read and analyze numerous literary works relevant to literature as a whole and to British culture in particular, making connections between various literary periods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and summarize the major eras of development of literature from the beginning of Romanticism in the late 18th Century through the 19th century Victorians and to the Moderns of the early 20th century and Post-Moderns of the present.
  • differentiate the times and concerns of the writers covered, tracing threads of thought, contrasting views and approaches, and synthesizing various ideas.
  • criticize and analyze literature of these periods, defining key ideas and explaining cause/effect relationships associated with the literary movements using relevant literary terms.
  • compose focused, analytical essays showing insight into the themes expressed in the literature of these historical periods.
  • compare and contrast various works of literature and themes through discussion and in writing.

ENGLT 313 Arthurian and Chivalric Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLT 310
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves a survey mainly of English Literature concerning tales of King Arthur and his court and other related chivalric romances. The course considers the history and development of chivalric literature, noting the contributions of French and other European sources and of American sources, but the course's primary scope focuses on contributions to chivalric literature from British sources such as Malory's "Le Morte D'Arthur," "The Mabinogi," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," Tennyson's "Idylls of the King."

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a knowledge of historical background, literary conventions, themes, and characters and events associated with Arthurian/Chivalric literature.
  • analyze complex passages and themes of Arthurian/Chivalric literature by applying knowledge of key literary terms and conventions.
  • formulate generalizations and develop insightful conclusions based on careful interpretation and analysis.
  • critique plot and character development and construct arguments supported with textual evidence.
  • detect significant literary and historical allusions and key themes and concerns.

ENGLT 319 Introduction to English Epic Poetry

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLT 310, 311, and 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves a study of English Epic poetry, literature too long and too complex to be covered in traditional English literature survey courses. This course reviews the conventions of epic poetry (with a focus on the works by Homer and Virgil), explains the typical structure, devices, and concerns of the epic, and studies the particular development of the English epic with analysis of epic poetry by Spenser, Milton, and Wordsworth (or any other English work of literature that could be considered an epic like Beowulf or Tennyson's Idylls of the King). Additionally, this course involves a cursory study of the lives of the poets and of their times to understand themes in their respective works, ultimately to put their poems in an historical context and to recognize their influences on literature and on the world as a whole and to appreciate these poems individually as works of art.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a knowledge of the conventions of epic literature as a whole and of English epic literature in particular.
  • analyze complex passages and themes of English epic poetry by applying knowledge of key literary terms and conventions of epic literature.
  • formulate generalizations and develop insightful conclusions based on careful interpretation and analysis.
  • critique plot and character development and construct arguments supported with textual evidence.
  • detect significant literary and historical allusions and key themes.

ENGLT 320 American Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course surveys representative early American literature from approximately 1620 to 1865, the Civil War period. It begins with a consideration of pre-colonial American influences such as Native American oral tradition and European exploration of the Americas, through Colonial literature, to the emergence of a distinctive national literature, the "American Renaissance," "reformism," and the diversity of voices that will continue into modern American literature.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • criticize and analyze literature of these periods, defining key ideas and comparing and contrasting various works through discussion, presentation, and in writing.
  • differentiate the times and concerns of the writers covered in the context of events in American history.
  • evaluate and analyze the elements of literature in fiction, poetry, prose, and drama.
  • compose focused, analytical essays showing insights into themes expressed by American authors.

ENGLT 321 American Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 135
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course surveys representative American literature from approximately 1865 (the post-Civil War period) to the present, with consideration of important aspects of American literary history. It begins with the end of the Romantic period and follows the rise of Realism and Modernism. The course may incorporate examples of local color, regionalism, social criticism, naturalism and determinism, and/or works by "Lost Generation" or modernist writers as well as contemporary authors and poets.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand and think critically about the significance of American literature in a variety of contexts, such as literary, historical, philosophical, political, social, geographical/regional, and/or academic contexts.
  • evaluate and analyze ideas and patterns in American literature through reading, discussion, and writing.
  • recognize elements of literature in poetry, prose, and drama.
  • compose focused analyses and arguments showing insights into themes explored and arguments made by American authors, using various rhetorical strategies and modes of literary criticism.
  • integrate research, evidence, and independent and collaborative thought into writing and critical thinking.

ENGLT 330 African American Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of the most representative African-American writers and periods of African-American Literature from slavery to the present. This comprehensive literary study includes analysis of significant historical and cultural influences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the literature critically, assess its historical significance and apply knowledge in college-level essays.
  • demonstrate an appreciation for the contributions of African-American writers and the political, social and historical significance of their works.
  • demonstrate critical thinking skills in class discussion and in written analytical essays.
  • demonstrate the ability to incorporate bibliographic research effectively into analytical papers.

ENGLT 339 Postmodern American Fiction

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 (College Writing) with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes American Fiction (1960-2000) that depicts postmodernism, the radical cultural and intellectual shift that has profoundly altered Western traditional thought and art. Students will gain a more critical awareness of the aesthetic, ideological, and philosophical issues of postmodernism, and understand how traditional assumptions about meaning-making were undermined by doubts about knowledge, perception, and identity. Students from various majors across the curriculum will have the opportunity to explore the important interconnections between literature, cultural studies, philosophy, art, art history, architectural studies, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and physics, all of which intersect in postmodern thought and fiction.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of recent developments in literature, literary theory, and culture.
  • synthesize literary perspectives with recent advances in the physical sciences, psychology, anthropology, cultural studies, and philosophy.
  • develop epistemological questions about language, narrative, logic and ideology.
  • clarify the distinctions between belief and knowledge in the construction of meaning.
  • evaluate and debate the impact of postmodernism on contemporary American culture.
  • critique a work of literature by integrating outside sources with the student's own interpretation.
  • research published critical work on postmodernism.

ENGLT 340 World Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves a survey of significant masterpieces of Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance literature from the Hebrew Bible to John Milton's Paradise Lost. Students will analyze numerous works of literature, comparing ideas across time, place, and culture and making connections between different literary works and between different literary periods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and summarize the major eras of development of world literature from the beginning to the middle 17th century, so as to understand the relationships between literature and significant historical events.
  • differentiate the times and concerns of the writers covered, tracing threads of thought, contrasting views and approaches, synthesizing various ideas, and identifying themes, myths, and archetypes as they emerge in the studied literature.
  • criticize and analyze literature of these periods, defining key ideas, explaining cause/effect relationships associated with the literary movements using relevant literary terms, and recognizing characteristics of various literary movements and genres as they emerge and develop in the chronology of the written tradition.
  • compose focused, analytical essays showing insight into the themes expressed in the literature of these historical periods, evaluating literature critically and assessing its significance historically.
  • compare and contrast various works of literature and themes through discussion and in writing.

ENGLT 341 World Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 145
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves a survey of significant masterpieces of modern world literature from the middle of the seventeenth century to the present. Students will analyze numerous works of literature, comparing ideas across time, place, and culture and making connections between different literary works and between different literary periods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and summarize the major eras of development of world literature from the middle of the seventeenth century to the present, so as to understand the relationships between literature and significant historical events.
  • differentiate the times and concerns of the writers covered, tracing threads of thought, contrasting views and approaches, synthesizing various ideas, and identifying themes, myths, and archetypes as they emerge in the studied literature.
  • criticize and analyze literature of these periods, defining key ideas, explaining cause/effect relationships associated with the literary movements using relevant literary terms, and recognizing characteristics of various literary movements and genres as they emerge and develop in the chronology of the written tradition.
  • compose focused, analytical essays showing insight into the themes expressed in the literature of these historical periods, evaluating literature critically and assessing its significance historically.
  • compare and contrast various works of literature and themes through discussion and in writing.
  • research the lives, the works, and the movements associated with various periods surveyed.

ENGLT 345 Mythologies of the World

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines some of the myths underlying the western world view, and recognizes diversity and commonality in myths from Middle Eastern, Native North American, African, Asian, and South American cultures. Students compare and contrast myths from different cultures and analyze various themes, including: the goddess culture, the nature of creation, the dying and reviving god, and the hero's journey. In addition, students will identify Judaeo-Christian themes in various myths and evaluate the myths' psychological applications. From this process, they will gain an understanding of ethnocentrism, ethnicity and racism and the impact of these on the American experience.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast myths from various cultures and identify similar motifs, archetypes, and symbols.
  • evaluate various interpretations of specific myths and analyze the assumptions underlying these interpretations.
  • analyze such themes in myth as the hero's journey, the great goddess, the human relationship to god(s), and the creation and destruction of the universe.
  • evaluate myth's contribution to various societies' views of such things as the afterlife, the purpose of ritual, the status of men and women, and the establishment of social hierarchies.

ENGLT 360 Women in Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of literature from the Middle Ages through the 21st Century, designed for students who are interested in examining the writing of and about women and their roles in literature, both as writers and as protagonists. Emphasis will be placed on literature that develops protagonists and explores literary themes found in these works, such as: women representative of or in conflict with their societies; women and power; women as daughters, wives, mothers, sisters, leaders; independence vs. dependence; domestic vs. public space; women in relation to men and to each other. In developing cultural competency, students will also explore related issues as discovered in the readings, including ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, classism, gender construction, gender inequity, sexual orientation, and religious differences. The literary selections may include essays, biographies, short stories, novels, poems, and plays. These works will be considered in various critical and theoretical perspectives: feminist, historical, formalist/ New Critical, psychoanalytical, sociological, biographical, Marxist, and eco-critical.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write analytically and persuasively about a variety of literary works by and about women from the Middle Ages through the beginning of the 21st century.
  • analyze the major themes, ideas, forms and modes of expression contained in the literature.
  • evaluate the various historical, cultural, philosophical and personal contexts and perspectives presented in the literature.
  • appraise literary print and electronic research sources, and synthesize them effectively into their writing.

ENGLT 370 Children and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of the best literature--past and present--created for children and of the criteria for selecting and evaluating children's literature. It includes discussion of the history of children's literature and of current issues such as censorship, literacy, and multicultural diversity. The course is intended for prospective K-8 teachers, preschool teachers, early childhood education (ECE) majors, parents, and anyone who enjoys reading children's literature.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the genres of children's literature, discussing the use of themes and elements of fiction or poetry in various works.
  • analyze the contributions of outstanding authors and illustrators of children's literature.
  • evaluate and apply selection criteria for children's literature.
  • create activities for helping children to experience, appreciate, and respond to literature.
  • evaluate literature portraying diverse perspectives, identifying the cultural connections literature can offer children.

ENGLT 402 Introduction to Shakespeare and Film

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 via the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will draw connections between traditional and contemporary literary genres as students read William Shakespeare's selected histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances, critically analyzing film versions of the plays, and examining the effects of various cultural eras from Elizabethan to contemporary culture on various stage and film versions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically analyze and respond thoughtfully to Shakespeare's plays.
  • interpret dramatic literature and analyze its production as a cinematic piece.
  • evaluate different versions of the same play by different directors and actors.
  • correlate dramatic literature with other fields of study and recognize the power of dramatic literature as a humanizing force.

ENGLT 495 Independent Studies in Literature

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

English - Reading (ENGRD)

ENGRD 16 Basic Reading Skills

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 48
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is the beginning level class in the FLC reading sequence and is the prerequisite course for ENGRD 110. The class will be taught in lecture format. It is designed to prepare students for the higher level reading skills required in college and in the workplace. Areas of concentration include comprehension skills such as using before, during and after reading strategies, finding the main idea, identifying supporting details and making inferences; basic textbook reading techniques; and vocabulary development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply before, during, and after reading strategies.
  • differentiate between topic, main idea, and supporting details in a reading passage.
  • recognize and interpret simple inferences.
  • incorporate textbook reading strategies and summarize reading materials.
  • develop vocabulary study techniques, such as dictionary usage and knowledge of word parts.

ENGRD 18 Individualized Reading Skills

  • Units:1 - 2
  • Hours:18 - 36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers individualized reading instruction modules at a wide range of skill levels, from basic to advanced, designed to help the student improve reading skills in specific areas. Modules assigned will vary according to the student's needs and ability level. Specific skill areas could include: comprehension (stated and implied main idea, major and minor details, inferences, organization, fact from opinion, tone, evaluating arguments), vocabulary development, speed reading, and textbook reading skills. This course is graded Pass / No Pass. Students may register up to the 10th week of the semester if the course is not full. Scheduling is flexible, based on the FLC Reading and Writing Center or EDC English Center hours of operation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the concepts and skills covered by the individual reading module to future textbook reading assignments.
  • transfer specific vocabulary and reading comprehension skills to college curriculum reading tasks, to on the job reading tasks, and/or to reading tasks normally required outside the college environment.
  • exhibit at least 75% mastery of course materials as demonstrated in a series of content skill tests.

ENGRD 110 Comprehension Strategies and Vocabulary Development For College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 16, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLB 71
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to help students prepare for college level reading. Areas of concentration include vocabulary development, literal and inferential comprehension skills, textbook reading techniques, study skills, and reading for pleasure. Students will become more efficient readers by learning to vary reading rate depending upon their purposes for reading. Enrollment in ENGLB 71 is recommended for additional individualized help.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use vocabulary development techniques and achieve the vocabulary skills necessary for entrance to the next level of English Reading class.
  • apply literal and inferential reading skills to a variety of reading material in order to identify main ideas, recognize supporting details and patterns of organization, and draw inferences, judgments, and conclusions.
  • utilize textbook comprehension techniques.
  • evaluate one’s purpose for reading and adjust reading rate and techniques appropriately.

ENGRD 208 Reading for Academic Achievement

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:This course is not open to students who have already completed ENGRD 310: Critical Reading as Critical Thinking.
  • Advisory:ENGLB 71 and ENGWR 48
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the theory and practice of analytical and speed reading skills and strategies required for proficient and effective reading of college level reading materials. The class focuses on the following: scaffolding of proficient comprehension skills; analytical evaluation of college level essays; critical reading skills for college level textbooks; using critical reading and thinking skills when reading on the Internet and doing research; vocabulary development; and building of flexible reading rate and speed. These skills will be developed through application in varied reading materials. This course meets reading competency.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze essays or other printed material as well as electronic materials and apply such analytical reasoning skills as recognizing organizational patterns, evaluating use of support, and assessing relevancy and adequacy of information.
  • evaluate college level reading materials, demonstrating various individual reading skills.
  • utilize college level vocabulary.
  • apply effective and efficient reading rates for college level materials and use flexibility in assessing an appropriate reading speed for varied materials.
  • demonstrate college level reading skills in textbook reading, applying textbook reading and note-taking skills to college level textbooks from various disciplines.

ENGRD 310 Critical Reading as Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLB 71 or ENGRD 18
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the theory and practice of critical reading as critical thinking for successful academic performance. The course emphasizes the following areas: logic and its relation to written text; inductive and deductive reasoning; formal and informal fallacies; academic vocabulary advancement; development of effective and flexible reading rates; proficiency of textual comprehension; identification of rhetorical elements; discernment between factual evidence and opinion; strategic application of these abilities in reading university level texts. This course meets reading competency.One or more hours per week may be required in the Folsom Lake College Reading and Writing Center or English Center.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply vocabulary knowledge of word parts and contextual analysis to unfamiliar words.
  • employ appropriate strategies to regulate reading rate for reader-specified purposes and college level reading.
  • assess a text's main ideas, supporting reasoning and evidence, textual organizational structures, purpose, and tone in college level texts.
  • analyze the rhetorical elements of ethos (persona), pathos (audience), and logos (logic) and the deployment of those elements in the context of written texts.
  • evaluate inductive and deductive reasoning, implicit assumptions, formal and informal fallacies in university level texts.

English - Writing (ENGWR)

ENGWR 33 Support for College Composition

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGWR 300
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides further instruction in the critical thinking and writing skills for successful completion in college composition. Writing assignments are all connected to the students' assignments in ENGWR 300. The course includes the drafting, revision and editing process, as well as instruction in research and MLA citation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • construct essays that reveal a knowledge of the writing process, including pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.
  • compose fully developed, structured, coherent, and unified essays.
  • summarize, analyze, and respond to readings.
  • analyze and use researched sources in one's own writing.
  • apply the conventions of Standard Written English, including MLA citation and formatting.

ENGWR 39 Basic Writing Skill Development

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides instruction in basic writing skills, including the composing of simple, compound and complex sentences and a review of paragraph structure, organization and development. The class is taught in an individualized, modular format and is graded on a Pass/No Pass basis. Students may enroll up to the fourth week of the semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify sentence parts, including subjects and predicates.
  • construct correctly written simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • apply basic knowledge of the writing process to compose short paragraphs containing level appropriate topic sentences, supporting details and analysis.

ENGWR 41 Writing Skills

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 39, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This basic writing course will focus on single and multi-paragraph or short essay writing skills. Students will study and practice such things as the writing process, topic sentences, critical thinking and reading, creating clear and correct sentences, and developing the skills necessary to write focused, developed, organized paragraphs and short essays. Students will be responsible for writing a total of 2750 words. This course is designed to prepare the student for ENGWR 51.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply basic knowledge of the writing process to compose purposeful and persuasive paragraphs.
  • apply basic rules of grammar, mechanics and sentence structure to written assignments.
  • apply a basic comprehension of written texts and of the fundamental connection between reading and writing.

ENGWR 46 Individualized Writing Skills

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class offers personalized writing instruction programs at a wide range of skill levels designed to help the student acquire or improve writing skills in specific areas. Programs assigned will vary according to the student's needs, goals, and ability level. Specific skill areas could include: grammar, punctuation and mechanics, sentence coordination and subordination, topic sentence, paragraph and essay development and organization, thesis statement, and rhetorical modes. This course is graded on a Pass/ No Pass basis. Students may register through the 10th week of the semester. Scheduling is flexible depending on the FLC Reading and Writing Center or EDC or RCC English Center hours of operation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the concepts and skills covered by the individual writing module to future college writing assignments.
  • transfer specific writing skills to college curriculum writing tasks and/or writing tasks required outside the college environment.
  • apply instructor's assessment of writing skills to areas that may require continued study.

ENGWR 47 Individualized Spelling Skills

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers individualized instruction programs at a wide range of skill levels designed to help the student acquire or improve specific spelling skills. Modules assigned will vary according to student's needs and ability level. Specific skill areas could include: phonics review of long and short vowels, prefixes and suffixes, commonly misspelled words, how to proofread and effectively use spell check, look alike, sound alike words, basic spelling rules. This course is graded on a Pass/ No Pass basis. Students may register through the 10th week of the semester. Scheduling is flexible, based on the FLC Reading and Writing Center or EDC English Center's hours of operation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the concepts and skills covered by the individual spelling module to future college or workplace writing.
  • transfer specific spelling skills to college curriculum or workplace writing tasks normally required outside college.
  • identify problematic areas in his or her own writing and apply specific editing strategies to correct those areas
  • exhibit at least 75% mastery of course materials as demonstrated in a series of content skill tests.

ENGWR 48 Individualized Vocabulary Skills

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Individualized instruction modules at a wide range of skill levels designed to help the student acquire and/or improve written vocabulary skills and usage. Modules assigned will vary according to student's needs and ability level. Specific skill areas could include: using words in context; effective dictionary usage; prefixes, suffixes and roots; job-related, college related and/or other specialized vocabularies. This course is graded on a Pass/No Pass basis. Students may register through the 10th week of the semester. Scheduling is flexible, based on the FLC Reading and Writing Center or EDC English Center's hours of operation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the concepts and skills covered by the individual vocabulary module to future college assignments or readings.
  • transfer specific vocabulary skills to college curriculum reading tasks, to on the job reading tasks, and/or to reading tasks normally required outside the college environment.
  • exhibit at least 75% mastery of course materials as demonstrated in a series of content skills tests.
  • identify problem areas in his or her writing and apply specific vocabulary usage strategies to those areas

ENGWR 51 Developmental Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 41 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This writing course, designed to prepare students for ENGWR 101, will focus on paragraph and short essay writing. Students will study and practice the writing process, learn to create clear and correct sentences, and develop the skills necessary to write a variety of focused, developed, organized paragraphs and short essays. Level appropriate related readings will help students develop critical thinking skills. Students will be responsible for writing up to five full-process essays as part of a 3000 word writing requirement for this class.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply knowledge of the writing process to write thoughtful and persuasive paragraphs and short essays.
  • apply knowledge of grammar and mechanics (including such things as sentence boundaries, subject/verb agreement, pronoun reference, and punctuation) to create relatively error-free prose.

ENGWR 101 College Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This writing course, designed to prepare the student for ENGWR 300, will focus on reading and writing as integrally related skills. Students will study and practice such things as the writing process, summarizing, critical thinking, creating clear/varied correct sentences and incorporating sources as they develop the skills necessary to write a variety of focused, developed, organized essays. Students will be responsible for writing at least four full-process essays (at least 3000 words total).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate understanding of writing as a process that includes pre-writing, drafting, and revising by composing unified, structured, developed essays.
  • read analytically and think critically about professionally written texts, incorporating the ideas of others into their writing where appropriate.
  • compose relatively error free and rhetorically effective sentences of a variety of lengths and patterns to help achieve purpose in writing.

ENGWR 300 College Composition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course emphasizes writing and includes reading, research, and critical thinking skills essential for successful completion of a college degree. Writing assignments include expository and argumentative essays (6,000 words minimum for course) using MLA documentation and format. Reading assignments include a variety of transfer-level texts of substantial length including one full-length literary work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and evaluate his/her own writing as well as the works of others.
  • evaluate information from other sources and synthesize this information fluidly to support their own thesis statements and argumentative claims.
  • write academic essays which exhibit a meaningful purpose and which use the elements of persuasion where appropriate.
  • correctly apply the conventions of Standard Written English, including MLA citation and formatting.

ENGWR 301 College Composition and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area A3; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers study and practice in critical reading of and analytical writing about literature. Students read fiction, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and criticism from diverse cultural sources and perspectives. With a minimum of four critical essays totaling 6000 words, and the use of relevant external sources, students analyze, criticize, reason inductively and deductively, and reach evaluative conclusions based on evidence and sound inferences derived from their close readings of literary texts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate literary works, identifying literary elements and applying appropriate criteria for the genre being evaluated.
  • evaluate critical interpretations of literary works, articulating and analyzing assumptions underlying these interpretations.
  • compose focused analytical essays, supporting interpretations with relevant textual support.
  • reason inductively from appropriate literary elements to support conclusions about literary texts.

ENGWR 302 Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for students who have had ENGWR 300 and who desire further instruction in the techniques of effective critical thinking as expressed in written argument and by the major principles of advanced composition and rhetoric. Essays written for the course (6,000 words minimum) draw from a variety of texts and contexts to present carefully reasoned arguments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and evaluate their own writing as well as the work of other writers, demonstrating an ability to articulate unstated assumptions and to detect commonly committed fallacies.
  • write insightful essays that demonstrate critical thinking and evaluate the ideas of others, recognizing and making concessions when necessary.
  • compose rhetorically sophisticated sentences to help achieve their purposes in writing.

ENGWR 495 Independent Studies in English - Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019